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Local News

  • A hot issue on the campaign trail: theology

    Rick Perry dived right in. The Texas governor, now a Republican presidential candidate, held a prayer rally for tens of thousands, read from the Bible, invoked Christ and broadcast the whole event on the Web. There was no symbolic nod to other American faiths, no rabbi or Roman Catholic priest among the evangelical speakers. It was a rare, full-on embrace of one religious tradition in the glare of a presidential contest.

    Looks like another raucous season for religion and politics.

    And yet, there was a time when all of this was simpler. Protestants were the majority, and candidates could show their piety just by attending church.

  • Tropical Storm Lee's outer bands pelt Gulf Coast

    NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Heavy rains from Tropical Storm Lee were falling in southern Louisiana and pelting the Gulf Coast on Saturday as the storm's center trudged slowly toward land, where businesses were already beginning to suffer on what would normally be a bustling holiday weekend. The storm could bring as many as 20 inches of rain to some areas.

    Tropical storm warning flags were flying from Mississippi to Texas and flash flood warnings extended along the Alabama coast into the Florida Panhandle. The storm's slow forward movement means that its rain clouds should have more time to disgorge themselves on any cities in their path.

  • Mortillaro named permanent NCRTD executive director

    Anthony Mortillaro, a former Los Alamos County Administrator, no longer is the interim executive director of the North Central Regional Transit District. The NCRTD board voted Friday to remove the interim tag and make Mortillaro the permanent executive director.

    In a weighted vote, the board voted 23-2 for Mortillaro with the pueblos of San Ildefonso and Tesuque casting the no votes.

    The board interviewed Mortillaro and two other top candidates -- Joe Briscoe and Harry Montoya Friday. Then the board went into executive session for two hours before voting.

  • Lawmakers urged to keep Indian-majority districts 


    SANTA FE — Native American leaders urged lawmakers on Wednesday to safeguard Indian-majority districts when the Legislature redraws the boundaries of New Mexico’s elective office districts.
    There are nine districts — six in the House and three in the Senate — in which Indians account for at least 65 percent of the population. The districts are in northwestern and north-central New Mexico.
    A group representing tribes and pueblos in New Mexico on Wednesday outlined redistricting proposals to a legislative committee that will continue that number of Indian-majority districts.

  • In Brief 09-02-11

    Power outage in White Rock

    Officials at the Los Alamos Dept. of Public Utilities reported that a lightning strike damaged two overhead line fuses causing a power outage that began at 7 p.m. Thursday in the Bryce Avenue neighborhood of White Rock.  Approximately 80 customers were affected.  
    Power was restored to half of affected customers by 8 p.m., and after a fuse mechanism was replaced on the second fuse, the remaining customers had power restored by 9:44 p.m.

    DPU to check meters

  • Update 09-02-11

    Lunch with a Leader

    The League of Women Voter’s Lunch with a Leader will be at 11:45 a.m. Sept. 8 at Central Avenue Grill. The guest speaker will be Los Alamos County Environmental Services Specialist Tom Nagawiecki.

    Fuller Lodge

       The Fuller Lodge Historic Districts Advisory Board will meet at 5 p.m. Sept. 7 in the Curtis Room.

    No trash collection

    There will be no residential or commercial trash or recycling collection on Sept. 5. If Monday is your normal collection day, please put out your roll carts by 8 a.m. Wednesday.

    Ranger talk

  • Three county clerk employees receive certifications

    Three Los Alamos County employees received certifications from The NM EDGE County College program during the New Mexico Association of Counties annual summer conference in Roswell.

    Sheryl Nichols, Los Alamos County’s chief deputy clerk, and Adrianna Ortiz, the county’s senior deputy clerk, were presented the New Mexico Certified County Clerk designation, while Bonnie Montoya, of the county’s assessor office, received the certified public official designation.

    The NM EDGE, which stands for Education Designed to Generate Excellence in the public sector, is a program administered by New Mexico State University’s Cooperative Extension Service.

  • Review says no to one-lane roundabouts

    The results of Ourston Roundabout Engineering’s peer review of MIG’s NM 502/Trinity Drive Transportation Corridor Study and Plan are in, and the findings are unequivocal.
    “Our results show that single-lane roundabouts will not adequately handle the existing or future traffic volumes for select approaches.”
    Ourston’s examination consisted of a review of the entire study plus an analysis of four of the corridor’s intersections. It also compared the results obtained with the SIDRA software MIG used to those obtained using ARCADY, another roundabout analysis program.

  • Seen at the Scene: Seed Balls

    On Aug. 20, almost 600 residents came together to assist Los Alamos High School senior Jin Park and Los Alamos County employee Craig Martin, in a seed ball project that will aid reforestation efforts for the surrounding community affected by the Las Conchas Fire.


  • Utility to stop river diversions until Nov. 1

    ALBUQUERQUE  — Hundreds of thousands of water utility customers in the Albuquerque area will have to rely solely on groundwater for the next two months.
    The Albuquerque Bernalillo County Water Utility Authority says it’s stopping the diversion of surface water from the Rio Grande at least until Nov. 1.
    The utility made the announcement Thursday. It’s taking the action due to the continued presence of ash in the river from post-fire runoff and drought conditions. Utility officials say their treatment plant is capable of removing ash, but treating the ash-laden water has become cost-prohibitive because of the additional chemicals and energy required.