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Local News

  • Martinez GOP speech rescheduled, goes before Ryan

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — The scheduled speech by New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez at the Republican National Convention has been rescheduled thanks to Tropical Storm Isaac.

    Martinez is scheduled to speak Wednesday around 8 p.m. New Mexico time, right before GOP Vice Presidential nominee Rep. Paul Ryan is slated to speak.

    A primetime speaking role increases the potential for national television exposure for Martinez, who is the nation's first Latina governor.

    Martinez was elected in 2010 and is the first female governor of New Mexico.

  • New Orleans Braces for Isaac
  • Isaac aims at north Gulf Coast after raking Fla.

    KEY WEST, Fla. (AP) — Tropical Storm Isaac churned toward the northern Gulf Coast early Monday and promised to give the Republican National Convention a good drenching after lashing the Florida Keys with wind and rain but apparently causing little damage.

    The National Hurricane Center predicted Isaac would grow to a hurricane over the warm Gulf of Mexico and possibly hit late Tuesday somewhere along a stretch that starts west of New Orleans and runs to the edge of the Florida Panhandle. That would be one day shy of seven years after Hurricane Katrina struck catastrophically in 2005.

    In the Florida Keys, Monroe County Sheriff's spokeswoman Becky Herrin said there were no injuries and few reports of damage as the storm crossed near Key West on Sunday.

    Much of the rest of South Florida remained under a tornado watch early Monday as the remnants of Isaac moved across the area.

    In Tampa, flooding prompted the closure of several main roads early Monday including three near downtown where the Republican convention was to be held.

  • Gulf Coast Residents Prepare for Isaac
  • Today in History for August 27th
  • Gulf Coast Residents Warned About Isaac
  • Raw Video: Isaac Being Felt in Florida
  • Today in History for August 26th
  • Work on LAGC clubhouse begins

    After delays and setbacks that will push its opening back by nearly a year, the county broke ground on the new golf course community building under stormy skies Friday.

    “A project like this is not possible without vision, passion and a goal,” Council Vice Chair Geoff Rodgers said. “Many times I think the county council gets credit for leadership on projects like this, but it’s really the citizens who champion these projects that deserve the credit. When I speak in terms of passion for a project like this, it’s those people that I have in mind.”

    One of the people Rodgers specifically thanked for their commitment was project sponsor and former Golf Course Manager Dennis McCloskey.

    “We started on this project 14 years ago, before the Cerro Grande fire,” McCloskey said. “We stuck with it. We had all the backing of the groups. It was really nice to see the turnout at the public meetings in support of this project.”

  • Los Alamos researchers study climate change

    SANTA FE (AP) — For a plant physiologist whose research points to a looming disaster in the world as we know it, Nate G. McDowell is a surprisingly upbeat guy.

    “I’m excited. This is such an awesome project,” said McDowell, a Los Alamos National laboratory staff scientist, as he gave a tour of his latest research site near Bandelier National Monument.

    In a way, McDowell’s getting to do what he loved as a boy growing up in Washington state’s Olympic rainforest — run around in the woods. Only now, his play has evolved into critical research modeling the death of New Mexico pinons and junipers as temperatures climb and drought deepens.

    McDowell steps inside one of the cylindrical plexiglass and steel chambers near two of the trees he’s likely to kill in his research. It is blisteringly hot inside already at 9:30 a.m. He confesses to loving trees, “dead or alive.”

    “I do think about that (killing trees),” McDowell said, acknowledging a twinge of guilt now and then. “But we have to kill the trees to understand how they die. Not a lot of them, just a few.”