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Local News

  • Details about second truck crash on NM 4 emerge

    More details emerged about the crash of the second semi truck that lost its haul of crushed cars on N.M. 4 on Friday.

    The crash closed the road for the second straight day heading into the Jemez Mountains, causing headaches for those commuting and vacationing in the area.

    The second crash occurred at the first hairpin turn on N.M. 4 before the West Jemez intersection.
    Los Alamos police officer Albert Rael was first on the scene and he first talked with the driver of the truck, Miguel Machain Espinoza.

    Rael asked Espinoza how the accident happened.

    According to the narrative from the police report, Espinoza said he was going around the turn about 2 mph and he was trying to use as much of the road as possible.

  • Bachmann slides ideas into 11-point economic plan

    ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — Searching for a campaign boost, Republican presidential candidate Michele Bachmann attached a catchy slogan Tuesday for a newly packaged 11-point proposal for repairing the U.S. economy.

    Her "American Jobs, Right Now" framework calls for tax accommodations that would give companies incentive to re-invest at home money that presently is earned abroad. She also would decrease government worker salaries, eliminate an inheritance tax and roll back a slate of federal regulations. That includes repeal of President Barack Obama's signature health law.

  • 7 survive 20 hours at sea clinging to boat, cooler--video extra

    MARATHON, Fla. (AP) — Eight relatives had set out to fish in less-than-ideal conditions off the Florida Keys. It was raining, seas topped 7 feet and winds were whipping up to 38 mph.

    Before they knew it, two waves hit, capsizing their anchored 22-foot boat and knocking them into the sea about 3 1/2 miles offshore Saturday. Seven, including a 4-year-old, survived by clinging to their capsized vessel and a small blue cooler for nearly 20 hours, suffering exhaustion, jellyfish stings and hypothermia. A 79-year-old woman, the matriarch of the group, was missing and presumed drowned.

  • Republicans starting to pile on Romney

    CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — The Republican presidential race is quickly becoming a scattershot effort to deny Mitt Romney the GOP nomination by any means necessary.

    His rivals descended this week on what is essentially his home turf and they are ready to challenge the former Massachusetts governor on the economy, his central campaign theme, in a Tuesday night debate focused on that issue.

    But don't expect the criticism from Romney's opponents to stop there, given that time is quickly running out before the first votes are cast in the GOP nominating fight.

  • Senate Republicans likely to kill Obama jobs bill

    WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama's jobs bill, facing a critical test in the Senate, appears likely to die at the hands of Republicans opposed to stimulus spending and a tax surcharge on millionaires.

    Obama has been waging a campaign-style effort seeking to rally public support behind the $447 billion measure, which will be the subject of a Senate vote Tuesday. The plan combines payroll tax cuts for workers and businesses with $175 billion in spending on roads, school repairs and other infrastructure, as well as unemployment assistance and help to local governments to avoid layoffs of teachers, firefighters and police officers.

  • Documents: Wis. woman hatched plan to steal baby--video extra

    MILWAUKEE (AP) — Desperate to give her boyfriend a son but unable to conceive, Annette Morales-Rodriguez faked a pregnancy for months, court documents say, then began trolling Milwaukee's streets for pregnant women in hopes of stealing an unborn baby.

    After two days of searching, the 33-year-old woman finally spotted Maritza Ramirez-Cruz, who was just a week from her due date. Morales-Rodriguez lured the young Puerto Rican immigrant into her home, according to court documents, and beat her with a baseball bat before cutting her full-term fetus from her womb with an X-Acto knife, killing both the mother and the baby.

  • Go ‘Into the Woods’ with LALO

    Once upon a time, in a far off kingdom, there lived a young maiden whose name was Cinderella.
    The poor girl’s mother had died, and her father had taken a woman with two daughters of her own for his new wife. The girl wanted more than anything in the world to go to the King’s Festival.
    But her new stepmother and stepsisters were in no way kind-hearted and did everything in their power to keep poor Cinderella from getting what she wished. To make matters worse, her father wasn’t much help.

  • Governor rejects redistricting plans

    SANTA FE  —  Republican Gov. Susana Martinez on Friday vetoed Democratic-backed legislative and Public Regulation Commission redistricting plans that she criticized as partisan proposals that would make it harder for GOP candidates to compete in some parts of New Mexico for the rest of this decade.
    Democrats hold majorities in the state House and Senate. Republicans narrowed the Democratic advantage in the House in last year’s elections and hope they can pick up more seats in 2012.

  • Update 10-09-11

    Council meeting

    The County Council will meet at 7 p.m., Tuesday for a special session in council chambers.

    LTAB meeting

    The Lodgers Tax Advisory Board will meet at 1 p.m. , Oct. 18 in the chamber conference room.

    PEEC Talk

    Nate McDowell of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Climate Research Lab, will give a talk on the “Effects of Climate on Plants,” at 7 p.m. Wednesday at the Pajarito Environmental Education Center, 3540 Orange St. The talk is free.

    Bond meet

  • Safety board wary of seismic issues at LANL

    The latest Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board’s report to Congress reiterated its concern about the Department of Energy relying on the current Chemistry and Metallurgy Research facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the 9212 Complex at Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge, Tenn.

    In a report, Chairman Peter Winokur, wrote, “The Board recognizes that Congress has authorized replacements for each of these facilities, but the fact remains that both will be called upon to support essential mission work for at least another decade.