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Local News

  • Pueblo exerts land rights

    If you like to hike, shoot or off-road in Guaje or Rendija canyon, you need to do two things before you head out next time.

    Respect the fence and do some homework as to where you can go and where you can’t. Recently, members of San Ildefonso Pueblo have been busy asserting their rights to U.S. Forest Service and U.S. Department of Energy lands that were officially transferred to the pueblo in 2005 through the Pueblo de San Ildefonso Claims Settlement Act. According to the Settlement act, about 7,000 acres have been transferred to the pueblo.

    “It’s changed the boundaries of the National Forest significantly,” Los Alamos Police Chief Wayne Torpy said of the act at a recent press conference. “The pueblo is in the process of fencing off some these lands that were acquired through the land transfers.”

    He also said access to National Forest lands is still available to all and that there are legal access points available.

    However, the days of going off the main roads in Guaje or Rendija Canyon to get in a little target practice are pretty much over, as members of the pueblo are busy putting up a barbed wire fence along both sides of most of the main roads leading into the canyons.

  • Hazardous release sickens 200 near El Paso

    SANTA TERESA, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico authorities say an unknown hazardous material release sickened about 200 people near the Mexican border just northwest of El Paso, Texas.

    A one-mile area surrounding the industrial park and border crossing at Santa Teresa was evacuated for a few hours Tuesday, and the nearby airport was closed.

    By Tuesday afternoon, only the industrial park remained off-limits as hazmat crews took samples to determine what made the people sick.

    Authorities say investigation initially centered at the FoamEx plant on the industrial park campus, but now is expanding to other areas in the park.

  • FDNY: 25 Rescued From Fire by Boat

    Firefighters used a boat to rescue 25 people from a huge fire in Queens, New York on Monday. At least five buildings were burning on the heavily flooded street.

  • 10 things to know for Tuesday

    Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and stories that will be talked about on Tuesday:

    1. SANDY SLAMS ASHORE, PUSHING WALL OF WATER INTO NYC

    Tunnels and subway stations are flooded. Across the East, millions lose power.

    2. DANGER DANGLES ABOVE NYC STREET

    A crane atop a 74-story building collapsed in high wind and hung limp above the sidewalk, forcing evacuations on the street and nearby buildings.

    3. HOW SANDY RAINED ON THE PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN

    Obama switched from campaigner to hands-on commander of the federal response to the superstorm, while Romney curtailed events and urged donations to relief efforts.

    4. SYRIAN CEASE-FIRE ENDS IN FAILURE

    The death toll during what was supposed to have been a four-day truce exceeded 500.

  • Today in History for October 30th
  • Sandy leaves death, damp and darkness in wake

    NEW YORK (AP) — As Superstorm Sandy marched slowly inland, millions along the East Coast awoke Tuesday without power or mass transit, with huge swaths of the nation's largest city unusually vacant and dark.

    New York was among the hardest hit, with its financial heart in Lower Manhattan shuttered for a second day and seawater cascading into the still-gaping construction pit at the World Trade Center.

    The storm that made landfall in New Jersey on Monday evening with 80 mph sustained winds killed at least 16 people in seven states, cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses from the Carolinas to Ohio, caused scares at two nuclear power plants and stopped the presidential campaign cold.

    The massive storm reached well into the Midwest: Chicago officials warned residents to stay away from the Lake Michigan shore as the city prepares for winds of up to 60 mph and waves exceeding 24 feet well into Wednesday.

  • Storm puts nation's oldest nuke plant on alert

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The nation's oldest nuclear power plant is on alert after waters from a colossal storm reached high levels.

    Oyster Creek in Lacey Township, N.J., was already offline for regular maintenance before Sandy, a superstorm downgraded Monday night from a hurricane, slammed the East Coast.

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission says an "unusual event" was declared around 7 p.m. when water reached a high level. The situation was upgraded less than two hours later to an "alert," the second-lowest in a four-tiered warning system.

    Federal officials say all nuclear plants are still in safe condition. They say water levels near Oyster Creek, which is along the Atlantic Ocean, will likely recede within a few hours.

    Oyster Creek went online in 1969 and provides 9 percent of New Jersey's electricity.

  • Large parts of Manhattan plunged into darkness

    NEW YORK (AP) — A superstorm that sent water rushing onto city streets has left a large swath of the lower part of Manhattan without power.

    Consolidated Edison spokesman Chris Olert said Monday evening that the power was out for most of Manhattan south of 26th Street.

    On the east side, the power outage extended from 29th Street south. There were some scattered areas that still had electricity.

    Olert said the damage stemmed from flooding and the probable loss of a transmission feeder.

    The power outage was separate from a planned power cut that Con Ed did in certain lower Manhattan neighborhoods to protect underwater systems from flood damage.

    Olert said there were 250,000 customers without power in Manhattan. A customer represents a single meter, so the number of people actually affected is likely higher.

  • Raw: Facade Falls Off Manhattan Building Front

    The facade has fallen off the front of a four-story Manhattan building, leaving apartments visible from the street. There are no reported injuries.

  • Raw: 14 Rescued, 2 Missing From Tall Ship Off NC

    A replica tall ship caught in Hurricane Sandy's wrath began taking on water, forcing the crew to abandon the boat Monday off the North Carolina coast. The Coast Guard rescued 14 crew members by helicopter, but two people were still missing.