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Local News

  • FACT CHECK: How Obama's Libya claims fit the facts

    EDITOR'S NOTE: An occasional look at statements by political leaders and how well they adhere to the facts.
    WASHINGTON (AP) — There may be less than meets the eye to President Barack Obama's statements Monday night that NATO is taking over from the U.S. in Libya and that U.S. action is limited to defending people under attack there by Moammar Gadhafi's forces.

    In transferring command and control to NATO, the U.S. is turning the reins over to an organization dominated by the U.S., both militarily and politically. In essence, the U.S. runs the show that is taking over running the show.

  • Obama strongly defends US military action in Libya--video extra

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Defending the first war launched on his watch, President Barack Obama declared Monday night that the United States intervened in Libya to prevent a slaughter of civilians that would have stained the world's conscience and "been a betrayal of who we are." Yet he ruled out targeting Moammar Gadhafi, warning that trying to oust him militarily would be a costly mistake.

    Obama announced that NATO would take command over the entire Libya operation on Wednesday, keeping his pledge to get the U.S. out of the lead — but offering no estimate on when the conflict might end.

  • Libyan rebels close in on key Gadhafi stronghold--video extra

    BIN JAWWAD, Libya (AP) — Rebel forces fought their way Monday toward Moammar Gadhafi's hometown of Sirte, a key government stronghold guarding the road to the capital Tripoli.

    Their rapid advance came on the back of international airstrikes that have battered Gadhafi's air force, armor and troops over the past week. The rebels have now recaptured all the territory they lost over the past week and brought them closer than ever to Sirte — within 60 miles (100 kilometers).

  • News minute
  • Obama to lay out his case on Libya to nation--video extra

    WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama is offering Congress and an anxious public his first detailed accounting of his rationale for U.S. military involvement in Libya and perhaps an answer to the burning question: What's next?

    His speech, set for 7:30 p.m. EDT Monday, comes after the administration scored an important diplomatic victory. NATO ambassadors on Sunday approved a plan for the alliance to assume from the U.S. command all aerial operations, including ground attacks.

    That will help Obama assure the nation he can deliver on his promise that the United States will be a partner in the military action against Libya, but not from the driver's seat. Bickering among NATO members delayed the process.

  • More radioactive water spills at Japan nuke plant--see video

    TOKYO (AP) — Workers discovered new pools of radioactive water leaking from Japan's crippled nuclear complex, officials said Monday, as emergency crews struggled to pump out hundreds of tons of contaminated water and bring the plant back under control.

    Officials believe the contaminated water has sent radioactivity levels soaring at the coastal complex and caused more radiation to seep into soil and seawater. Crews also found traces of plutonium in the soil outside of the complex on Monday, but officials insisted there was no threat to public health.

  • More obstacles impede crews in Japan nuke crisis--video extra

    TOKYO (AP) — Mounting problems, including badly miscalculated radiation figures and inadequate storage tanks for huge amounts of contaminated water, stymied emergency workers Sunday as they struggled to nudge Japan's stricken nuclear complex back from the edge of disaster.

    Workers are attempting to remove the radioactive water from the tsunami-ravaged nuclear compound and restart the regular cooling systems for the dangerously hot fuel.

    The day began with company officials reporting that radiation in leaking water in the Unit 2 reactor was 10 million times above normal, a spike that forced employees to flee the unit. The day ended with officials saying the huge figure had been miscalculated and offering apologies.

  • Wallace Discusses Voting Record

    Rep. Jeannette Wallace has been a staunch Republican for decades. She represents Los Alamos, Sandoval and Santa Fe counties.
    During the 2011 regular 60-day legislative session, which ended March 19, Wallace broke party lines and voted with the Democrats on several bills.
    “My district is not a Republican district – I’m serving three counties, which are mostly Democrat,” she said. “I’m surrounded by Democrats in the house. I’ve always made a practice of voting on the issue, not along party lines.”
    Wallace was the sole Republican in the house to vote yes on the budget –  General Appropriation of 2011 HB-2, which passed the house 35-34.

  • ‘Spies Beneath Berlin’

    Last week, Los Alamos resident Eugene Kovalenko and his wife, Birgitta, traveled to Fort Leonard Wood in Missouri where Kovalenko participated in a documentary film.
    It’s no ordinary film.
    It was about a spy tunnel that the American CIA and British Secret Intelligence Service (MI6) built in the 1950s beneath the Soviet sector in Berlin where three top secret Soviet and East German communication cables were buried.

  • First female VP candidate Ferraro dies at 75 


    BOSTON — Geraldine Ferraro, who in 1984 became the first woman vice presidential candidate on a major party ticket, died Saturday in Boston, a family spokeswoman said.
    Ferraro died at Massachusetts General Hospital, where she was being treated for blood cancer. She died just before 10 a.m. EDT, said Amanda Fuchs Miller, a family friend who worked for Ferraro in her 1998 Senate bid and was acting as a spokeswoman for the family.
    A three-term congresswoman from the New York City borough of Queens, Ferraro catapulted to national prominence in 1984 when she was chosen by presidential nominee Walter Mondale to join his ticket against incumbents Ronald Reagan and George H. W. Bush.