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Local News

  • Japanese nuke plant reactor breach 'grave and serious'--video extra

    TOKYO (AP) — A possible breach at Japan's troubled nuclear plant escalated the crisis anew Friday, two full weeks after an earthquake and tsunami first compromised the facility. The development suggested radioactive contamination may be worse than first thought, with tainted groundwater the most likely consequence.

    Japanese leaders defended their decision not to evacuate people from a wider area around the plant, insisting they are safe if they stay indoors. But officials also said residents may want to voluntarily move to areas with better facilities, since supplies in the tsunami-devastated region are running short.

  • Crews contain 70 percent of Colo. wildfire--video extra

    GOLDEN, Colo. (AP) — About 8,500 people were ordered to leave their homes Thursday as the second major wildfire to erupt this week in an outlying Denver suburb blackened 2.5 square miles.

    Officials ordered the evacuation of homes within a 4-mile radius of the fire near Franktown, about 35 miles southeast of Denver.

    High winds quickly spread the fire through grasses, brush and trees dried out from months of below-normal moisture. Strong winds fueled several grass fires on the eastern plains, including one that charred 8 square miles 95 miles southeast of Denver and burned two wooden bridges and a barn.

  • Los Alamos Canyon Reservoir work begins

    Reconstruction of the Los Alamos Canyon Dam has begun, closing access to the area for all foot and vehicular traffic, according to the Los Alamos Department of Public Utilities.
    The contractor, Kiewit, was given the Notice to Proceed, effective Monday. Dam reconstruction work will continue through the summer with completion slated for Nov. 15. For more information, see  www.losalamosnm.us/projects/utilities/Pages/LACanyonDamRestore.aspx.

     

  • Rules change on antelope licenses

    The Department of Game and Fish will conduct three public meetings in northeastern New Mexico this month to explain how landowners will be affected by new rules that change the way the state allocates private-land antelope licenses.
    The State Game Commission adopted the new rules affecting the Antelope Private Lands Use System, or A-PLUS, at its December 2010 meeting in Clovis.
    The rules were revised and adopted after consideration of Department recommendations, public comments during several commission meetings, more than 30 statewide public meetings, and hundreds of written public comments submitted over a period of more than two years.

  • Obama signs off on NM disaster declaration

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — President Barack Obama has signed a disaster declaration for New Mexico after the state was left cleaning up damage resulting from days of extreme cold temperatures and a natural gas outage that affected thousands of customers.

    The president's declaration of a major disaster in the state clears the way for federal aid to supplement state and local recovery efforts in several counties and tribal jurisdictions.

    The counties include Lincoln, Otero, Rio Arriba, Sierra, Socorro and Taos.

    Federal funding will be available on a cost-sharing basis for emergency work and the repair or replacement of facilities damaged by the severe winter weather.

  • U.S., Russia agree to extend nuclear security cooperation

    WASHINGTON – Deputy Secretary of Energy Daniel Poneman today announced the signing of an agreement to extend nuclear security cooperation between the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the Federal Environmental, Industrial and Nuclear Supervision Service of Russia (Rostechnadzor) for an additional seven years
    Speaking at the Embassy of the Russian Federation in Washington, Deputy Secretary Poneman announced the agreement, which will allow NNSA to continue work with Rostechnadzor to enhance its nuclear security regulations and inspection and training capabilities.

  • Court: Man mauled after smoking pot gets work comp

    KALISPELL, Mont. — The Montana Supreme Court has upheld a Workers’ Compensation Court ruling that about $65,000 in medical bills incurred by a man who was mauled while feeding the bears at a tourist attraction should be covered by workers’ compensation, despite the fact the man had smoked marijuana on the day of the attack.
    The court filed its opinion Tuesday, the Daily Inter Lake reported.
    Brock Hopkins filed a claim with the Uninsured Employers’ Fund in December 2007, saying he suffered injuries to his legs and buttocks when he was mauled by a bear at Great Bear Adventures near Glacier National Park on Nov. 2, 2007. Hopkins was treated for his injuries at a Kalispell hospital.

  • Update 03-24-11

    Brisket night
    The Los Alamos High School NJROTC will have a brisket dinner from 5:30-7 p.m. at the Posse Shack on North Mesa. The price will be $10 and the menu includes brisket, corn, potato salad, roll, cookies and a drink.

    School board meeting
    The Los Alamos Board of Education meeting has been rescheduled for 4 p.m. Friday at Suite V of 2075 Trinity Drive.

    CIP business
    There will be a special Capital Improvement Projects Business Meeting at 5:15 p.m. today at the Community Building Council Chambers.

    Star party
    Pajarito Environmental Education Center will host a Star Party at 7 p.m. March 26 with Dr. James Maxwell. Learn about the universe with a short illustrated talk.

  • Cost of the game to remain the same

    Golf enthusiasts won’t be asked to pony up any additional fees this season even though the county is embarking on an ambitious $5.3 million makeover of the Los Alamos Golf Course clubhouse.

    The Los Alamos County Council approved the 2011-2012 fees for the public course during its regular meeting Tuesday night.

    The council’s decision to hold the line on fees comes on the heels of a recent scathing review of the fee structure in the New Mexico Piglet Book, which takes aim at pointing out government waste of taxpayer dollars.

  • Big political challenges greet Obama's return home

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Returning home to some messy politics, President Barack Obama is confronting a battery of challenges, from a spending standoff that threatens to shut down the government to congressional angst over the U.S.-led attacks on Libya. Foreign crises rage across Africa and the Middle East, and Americans still want the economy to improve more quickly.