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Local News

  • Watch for lane drop

    Lane drop (temporary closure):
    East bound traffic will be reduced to one lane on Trinity Drive between 20 and 17 streets.  
    Beginning Tuesday, Los Alamos Department of Public Utilities’ contractor will begin trenching the sidewalk on the South side of Trinity to install a new electric conduit.  Pedestrian traffic will be safely routed around the construction zone.
    Use the queue space provided, take turns merging at the merge point, don’t block intersections, and drive defensively.  

  • Cowboy Breakfast Sunday

    Posse Lodge President Cary Grzadzinski serves a plate of vittles at a recent Cowboy Breakfast. The Los Alamos Sheriff’s Posse Lodge is hosting another Cowboy Breakfast 7-11 a.m. Sunday at the Lodge at 650 North Mesa Road near the stables. The menu includes plain, blueberry, banana and chocolate chip pancakes, sausage, bacon and eggs, juice and coffee. Cost: adults/$6, children 10  and younger/$4. Proceeds go to the Posse Lodge Restoration Fund.

  • Water shortage could impact NM's chili crop

    LAS CRUCES (AP) — An expected dry growing season could hurt the chili crop in southern New Mexico.

    There's a shortage of river water in Dona Ana County and a lack of a good groundwater supply in the Hatch area.

    Growers also say they're leaning toward planting cotton instead because of the water outlook. Cotton takes less water.

    Hatch vegetable farmer Jerry Franzoy says cotton looks especially favorable because it's experiencing a market boom this year.

  • Long blackouts pose risk to US reactors

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Long before the nuclear emergency in Japan, U.S. regulators knew that a power failure lasting for days at an American nuclear plant, whatever the cause, could lead to a radioactive leak. Even so, they have only required the nation's 104 nuclear reactors to develop plans for dealing with much shorter blackouts on the assumption that power would be restored quickly.

  • Syrian Cabinet resigns amid unrest

    DAMASCUS, Syria (AP) — Syria's Cabinet resigned Tuesday to help quell a wave of popular fury that erupted more than a week ago, threatening President Bashar Assad's 11-year rule in one of the most authoritarian nations in the Middle East.

    Assad, whose family has controlled Syria for four decades, is trying to calm the growing dissent with a string of overtures. He is expected to address the nation in the next 24 hours to lift emergency laws in place since 1963 and moving to annul other harsh restrictions on civil liberties and political freedoms.

  • Syrian Cabinet resigns amid unrest

    DAMASCUS, Syria (AP) — Syria's Cabinet resigned Tuesday to help quell a wave of popular fury that erupted more than a week ago, threatening President Bashar Assad's 11-year rule in one of the most authoritarian nations in the Middle East.

    Assad, whose family has controlled Syria for four decades, is trying to calm the growing dissent with a string of overtures. He is expected to address the nation in the next 24 hours to lift emergency laws in place since 1963 and moving to annul other harsh restrictions on civil liberties and political freedoms.

  • Gunmen kill 56 in grisly Iraq hostage siege

    BAGHDAD (AP) — Wearing military uniforms over explosives belts, gunmen held a local Iraqi government center hostage Tuesday in a grisly siege that ended with the deaths of at least 56 people, including three councilmen who were executed with gunshots to the head.

    The five-hour standoff in Tikrit, former dictator Saddam Hussein's home town, ended only when the attackers blew themselves up in one of the bloodiest days in Iraqi this year.

    First they set fire to the bodies of the three slain Salahuddin province councilmen in a brutal, defiant show of how insurgents still render Iraq unstable — even if it has so far escaped the political unrest rolling across the Arab world.

  • Kan: Japan on 'maximum alert' over nuke crisis--video added

    TOKYO (AP) — Japan's leader insisted Tuesday that the country was on "maximum alert" to bring its nuclear crisis under control, but the spread of radiation raised concerns about the ability of experts to stabilize the crippled reactor complex.

    Wan but resolute, Prime Minister Naoto Kan told parliament that Japan was grappling with its worst problems since World War II.

    "This quake, tsunami and the nuclear accident are the biggest crises for Japan" in decades, Kan said, dressed in one of the blue work jackets that have become ubiquitous among bureaucrats since the tsunami. He said the crises remained unpredictable, but added: "From now on, we will continue to handle it in a state of maximum alert."

  • FACT CHECK: How Obama's Libya claims fit the facts

    EDITOR'S NOTE: An occasional look at statements by political leaders and how well they adhere to the facts.
    WASHINGTON (AP) — There may be less than meets the eye to President Barack Obama's statements Monday night that NATO is taking over from the U.S. in Libya and that U.S. action is limited to defending people under attack there by Moammar Gadhafi's forces.

    In transferring command and control to NATO, the U.S. is turning the reins over to an organization dominated by the U.S., both militarily and politically. In essence, the U.S. runs the show that is taking over running the show.

  • Obama strongly defends US military action in Libya--video extra

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Defending the first war launched on his watch, President Barack Obama declared Monday night that the United States intervened in Libya to prevent a slaughter of civilians that would have stained the world's conscience and "been a betrayal of who we are." Yet he ruled out targeting Moammar Gadhafi, warning that trying to oust him militarily would be a costly mistake.

    Obama announced that NATO would take command over the entire Libya operation on Wednesday, keeping his pledge to get the U.S. out of the lead — but offering no estimate on when the conflict might end.