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Local News

  • School budget cuts stir emotions

    Teachers, librarians, parents and other Los Alamos Public Schools employees packed the conference room at the Pajarito Cliffs Site Thursday night to talk about the 2011-2012 proposed budget.

    The meeting began with a presentation by LAPS Superintendent Gene Schmidt, in which he outlined how New Mexico schools are funded, talked about the $8 million that LAPS gets from the Department of Energy, lease revenue funds, bond funds and referendum. He also gave a funding summary and went over the operational funding for 2010-2011.

  • UNM president to step down

    ALBUQUERQUE — University of New Mexico president David Schmidly is stepping down.
    He will leave the UNM presidency at the end of his contract on June 1, 2012, saying he wants to spend more time with his family.
    Schmidly became president of the state’s largest university in June 2007 after the Albuquerque school hired him away from Oklahoma State University.
    He was treated last year for a small abdominal tumor.
    UNM’s executive vice president for Health Sciences, Dr. Paul Roth, served as acting university president for a semester until Schmidly could resume the job.
    Schmidly said his health is not an issue in his decision to leave.

  • Opposition voiced for PNM rate hike

    ALBUQUERQUE — Environmental and consumer advocacy groups have filed dozens of pages of expert testimony with New Mexico regulators in opposition to a proposed rate increase by the state’s largest electric utility.
    Public Service Company of New Mexico is asking regulators for the increase mainly to recoup investments made in infrastructure to ensure reliability of its system for some 500,000 customers.
    The Public Regulation Commission has scheduled a hearing in May to consider PNM’s proposal. Much of the expert testimony was submitted to the commission last week.

  • County briefs 04-22-11

    Renovating playgrounds to be discussed April 30, May 3

    Residents are invited to attend a public meeting at 9 a.m. on April 30 at the playground located near the North Mesa tennis courts and Brewer Arena.
    Parks Division Manager Dick McIntyre will discuss the replacement and renovation of the playground.  
    Additionally, another public meeting will be held at 6 p.m. May 4 at the northeast corner of Community Park, which is located north of Central Park Square and adjacent to Peach and Nectar Streets.
    During this meeting, McIntyre will discuss the installation of a new playground at the park.

  • Grabbing a bite to eat

    A trio of deer is spotted grazing in the tall grass near a ravine along Rose Street Thursday morning.

  • Washington teen fakes pregnancy as school project

    TOPPENISH, Wash. (AP) — A high school student who faked her pregnancy for six months as a social experiment stunned a student assembly this week by taking off the belly bundle.

    Only a handful of people knew that 17-year-old Gaby Rodriguez wasn't really pregnant, including her mother, boyfriend and the principal, according to the Yakima Herald-Republic.

    They helped keep the secret from some of her siblings and her boyfriend's family and students and teachers, all as part of a senior project on stereotyping.

  • McCain: Increase military support to Libyan rebels

    BENGHAZI, Libya (AP) — U.S. Sen. John McCain called for increased military support Friday for Libya's rebels, including providing weapons, training and giving close air support to the opposition in the battle to oust Moammar Gadhafi.

    McCain, the top Republican on the Senate Armed Services Committee, said at a news conference in the rebels' stronghold of Benghazi in eastern Libya that he did not believe U.S. ground troops are in order.

  • Obama's deficit plans run into economic reality

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — President Barack Obama headed west to sell his big picture deficit-reduction plan. But many people are waiting for a quick fix to their own economic problems caused chiefly by persistent unemployment and the crippled housing market.

    Audiences in California and Nevada understood why it's important to get a handle on the deficit over the long term. Yet they made clear that the economic recovery hasn't fully taken hold in ways that are meaningful to them.

  • Japan plans disaster budget, building 100K homes

    TOKYO (AP) — Japan's government proposed a special $50 billion (4 trillion yen) budget to help finance reconstruction efforts Friday and plans to build 100,000 temporary homes for survivors of last month's devastating earthquake and tsunami.

    The twin disasters destroyed roads, ports, farms and homes and crippled a nuclear power plant that forced tens of thousands of more people to evacuate their houses for at least several months. The government said the damage could cost $309 billion, making it the world's most expensive natural disaster.

  • Toyota: Car production disrupted until Nov or Dec

    TOKYO (AP) — Toyota's global car production, disrupted by parts shortages from Japan's earthquake and tsunami, won't return to normal until November or December — imperiling its spot as the world's top-selling automaker.

    President Akio Toyoda apologized to customers for the delays due to the March 11 disasters that damaged suppliers in northeastern Japan, affecting automakers around the world.

    "To all the customers who made the decision to buy a vehicle made by us, I sincerely apologize for the enormous delay in delivery," Toyoda said at a news conference in Tokyo.