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Local News

  • Negotiations resume on spending bill

    WASHINGTON— Renewed House-Senate budget negotiations aimed at averting a government shutdown center on possibly cutting $33 billion from current spending levels, a senior congressional aide said Wednesday. Democrats pressed to ease GOP cuts to domestic agency budgets by slowing Pentagon growth and trimming so-called mandatory programs whose budgets run on autopilot.
    The $33 billion figure is well below the $60 billion-plus in cuts passed by the House last month but also represents significant movement by Senate Democrats originally backing a freeze at current rates. Tea party-backed GOP stalwarts want more, and it’s unclear whether they could live with the midway arrangement between top Democrats and Speaker John Boehner.

  • Update 03-30-11

    Summit Garden Club
    Summit Garden Club will meet and Dorothy Crawford will speak on “Designing with flowering branches.”
    For more information, call Betsy Comly, 672-1574.

     Web conference
    The National Private Duty Association will offer a web conference to help families in New Mexico facing hiring a caregiver for a family member, at 7 p.m. March 30. Sign up at www.privatedutyhomecare.org.

    County Council
    The County Council will meet at 7 p.m. April 5 at the Chambers in the Community Building.

     Dark Night
    The Pajarito Astronomers will host its first county sponsored Dark Night of 2011 at 7:30 p.m. April 2 at Spirio Soccer Field, Overlook Park.

  • Council rezones A-19-A tract in White Rock

    Los Alamos County has owned A-19-A, a 60-acre plot of land in White Rock, since 2002 and tried twice unsuccessfully to sell the parcel to developers.

    On Tuesday, the County Council took a different tact and agreed to rezone the tract from F-L (Federal Land) to P-L (Public Land). The vote was unanimous. The Council also agreed to rezone (A-19-B) a 5.4 acre tract at 115 State Road 4 from F-L to P-L. That vote was 5-1 with Vince Chiravalle the lone dissenter.

    “We want to get it out of the F-L designation and move it from F-L to P-L,” acting Community Development Department director Steve Brugger told the councilors. “We will be coming in for different zoning once the master plan has been established.”

  • Rebels retreat from Libya oil port under attack

    AJDABIYA, Libya (AP) — Moammar Gadhafi's ground forces recaptured a strategic oil town Wednesday and were close to taking a second, making new inroads in beating back a rebel advance toward the capital Tripoli. Western powers kept up the pressure to force Gadhafi out with new airstrikes to weaken his military, hints that they may arm the opposition and intense negotiations behind the scenes to find a country to give haven to Libya's leader of more than 40 years.

  • US offers $5 million bounty for ICE agent killers

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Obama administration on Wednesday offered an up to $5 million reward for information leading to the capture of the suspected drug traffickers who shot and killed a U.S. immigration agent and wounded another in Mexico last month.

    The State Department said its Narcotics Rewards Program would pay the amount to anyone coming forward with information that results in the arrest of those responsible for the February 15 attack that killed Jaime Zapata and wounded Victor Avila. Both men were agents with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

  • Safety hearing held for Arizona's nuke plant

    PHOENIX (AP) — Operators of the nation's largest nuclear power plant told Arizona utility regulators Tuesday the triple-reactor plant near Phoenix is safe and chances are remote that it could undergo a nuclear catastrophe such as the one in Japan.

    The Arizona Corporation Commission requested a special open hearing with officials from Arizona Public Service, the state's largest utility company, which runs the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station for a consortium of power companies.

  • US offers $5 million bounty for ICE agent killers

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Obama administration on Wednesday offered an up to $5 million reward for information leading to the capture of the suspected drug traffickers who shot and killed a U.S. immigration agent and wounded another in Mexico last month.

    The State Department said its Narcotics Rewards Program would pay the amount to anyone coming forward with information that results in the arrest of those responsible for the February 15 attack that killed Jaime Zapata and wounded Victor Avila. Both men were agents with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

  • FDA examines link between food dyes, hyperactivity

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The FDA is examining the link between dyes found in everyday foods and hyperactivity in children.

    At a two-day meeting starting Wednesday, an FDA advisory committee will decide whether available data links the dyes and the disorder. The panel will recommend Thursday whether the agency should further regulate dyes, do more studies on the issue or require better labeling of the additives. They could also recommend that the FDA do nothing at all.

  • House, Senate No. 2s battle over federal budget

    WASHINGTON (AP) — They're a pair of flamboyant lawyers who are fond of cameras and adept at messaging, two deputies with ambitions to land, someday, on top.

    So the emerging political warfare led by Democratic Sen. Chuck Schumer and Republican Rep. Eric Cantor, now playing out in multimedia form over the budget impasse, can resemble a Spy vs. Spy contest over some of the most serious issues facing Congress and the nation.

  • Syrian president blames protests on 'conspirators'

    DAMASCUS, Syria (AP) — Syrian President Bashar Assad blamed "conspirators" Wednesday for an extraordinary wave of dissent against his authoritarian rule, but he failed to lift the country's despised emergency law or offer any concessions in his first speech since the protests began nearly two weeks ago.

    Assad said Syria is facing "a major conspiracy" that aims to weaken this country of 23 million. The Assad family has ruled Syria for nearly 40 years, using the feared security services to monitor and control even the smallest rumblings of opposition. Draconian laws have all but eradicated civil liberties and political freedoms.