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Local News

  • Councilors will have a booth at market

    Los Alamos County Councilors will have a booth set up Thursday at the Los Alamos Farmers Market.
    The booth, which will allow residents and market visitors to meet with the councilors, will be open from 9-11 a.m.
    The Los Alamos Farmers Market is a weekly event. It runs from 7-12:30 p.m. at the Mesa Public Library’s overflow parking lot.
    Regularly, fruits and vegetables from local farmers are available for purchase at the market. Other specialty items that are often at the market include hanging plants, aprons, organic beauty products and blade sharpening services.

  • Civil Air Patrol

    Members of the Civil Air Patrol presented the colors Monday night as Lt. Bill Wolfe assumed command of the Los Alamos Composite Squadron.

  • Hospice project comes to a halt

    Donors recently received a letter from the Board of Directors of Los Alamos Visiting Nurse Services (LAVNS) informing them of a decision not to move forward with The Sanctuary at Canyon’s Edge, a hospice facility planned for the Boy Scout Lodge property on Canyon Road.
    The letter cited three major factors in the decision to halt the project: declining and unpredictable Medicare reimbursement, the impact of increasing costs and staffing needs, including escalating Medicare-required compliance, and fundraising challenges that proved greater than anticipated.
    The board provided more detail at a meeting for major donors last Wednesday.
    “The decision to stop this project is because we felt, when we first started, that a sanctuary can be self-sustaining, based on the Medicare reimbursement at the time and the costs that we were looking at and the number of people that we thought could take advantage of that Medicare benefit,” board President Lynn Finnegan said.
    Research by individual board members and a feasibility study conducted by Jim Monahan, a 20-year hospice veteran who currently serves as executive vice president of Tidewell Hospice in Sarasota, Florida, indicates that the facility would not be self-sustaining.

  • Today in history June 23
  • Henins appears in court after standoff with police

     

    Los Alamos resident Mark Henins made his first appearance in Los Alamos Municipal Court Monday morning, where Judge Alan Kirk  read to him the charges he’s accused of committing during an altercation with a neighbor Friday night. 

    Those charges were assault and damage to property.

    On Friday night, at around 6 p.m.police responded to a disturbance call at the Caballo Peaks Apartments at,  Canyon Road entrance to the apartments. When they arrived, they learned that Henins an alleged altercation with a neighbor and her daughter, where Henins allegedly made remarks of a sexual nature toward the daughter, then allegedly threw a rock through the daughter’s bedroom window.

    When police arrived, they tried to talk with Henins through a window in his apartment, but were not very successful. Then, one of the officers, looking through Henin’s apartment window, saw Henins take a gun off a table and retreat into an interior room of his apartment. Police evacuated residents from the complex and closed off Canyon Road.

    Eventually, they were able to convince Henins into giving himself up. Henins exited his apartment without the firearm and was taken to Los Alamos Medical Center for evaluation before being taken into custody.

  • Update 6-21-15

    Father's Day

    The Los Alamos High School golf program will hold a Father’s Day equipment sale at the old Los Alamos Golf Course pro shop. The sale will go from 8 a.m.-3:30 p.m.

    Council

    Los Alamos County Council will meet Tuesday at its chambers at the municipal building. The council will have a closed session with the Board of Public Utilities at 6 p.m. The regular meeting will start at 7 p.m.

    Future Energy

    A regular meeting of the Future Energy Resources Committee is scheduled for 11:30 a.m. Tuesday at the municipal building.

    APP board

    The Arts in Public Places Board will meet at 5:30 p.m. Thursday at the municipal building.

    Birding

    Los Alamos Nature Center will present “Birding Hot Spots in New Mexico” Tuesday. The event will feature authors Judy Liddell and Barbara Hussey, who wrote a book about birding in the state. It will start at 7 p.m. and is free.

    School board

    Los Alamos School Board will hold a special meeting and work session at 5:30 p.m. Thursday. The meeting will be at the schools’ administration building.

  • Woman ordered to have treatment

    Los Alamos resident Marion Loope was sentenced to 268 days of community service in district court last week.
    The sentence was based on three prior criminal cases that included the charges of two counts of battery against a police officer, and assault upon a peace officer and battery upon a police officer.
    In a plea agreement Loope agreed to plead guilty to one count of battery upon a police officer in an incident that happened in August of last year. All the other charges were dismissed.
    In the incident that included the police battery charge, Loope, who was a patient at the Los Alamos Medical Center, charged at a staff nurse, lifted a metal tray over her head and then threw it at her, that according to court records.
    The tray did not hit the nurse.
    When police apprehended her and attempted to take her to jail, she then kicked a police officer in the stomach while being seated in the back of a patrol car.
    The altercation was reported to have started when Loope became dissatisfied with her treatment and the types of medications she was being given. According to the records, while incarcerated for another incident earlier this year, Loope vandalized the county jail facilities, causing $2,721.80 in damages.

  • The night Emmanuel opened its doors to evil

    CHARLESTON, S.C. (AP) — When Angela Brown saw the Facebook post about a shooting at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church, her mind immediately leapt to her aunt. Whenever the doors to Emanuel were open to its flock, Ethel Lance was there.

    "This was her home," said her niece, standing in the shadow of its soaring spire, tears streaming down her face.

    So many people felt that way about "Mother" Emanuel.

    Founded in 1818 by a free black shoemaker, the church stood as a beacon in a port city through which many legions of Africans passed on their way to bondage. Torched by angry whites after one organizer led a failed slave revolt, Emanuel rose from the ashes to serve as a stop on the Underground Railroad, even as state leaders banned all black churches and forced the congregation itself underground.

    The current brick Gothic revival edifice was a mandatory stop for the likes of Booker T. Washington and the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. Still, Emanuel was not just a church for the black community.

    And so, when a young white man walked into the Bible study Wednesday evening and asked for the minister, no one thought twice. The Rev. Clementa Pinckney, Emanuel's senior pastor, invited the stranger to sit beside him.

  • Today in history June 20
  • Today in history June 20