.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Local News

  • Bandelier hosting citizens' ceremony

    For the fourth year in a row, Bandelier National Monument is partnering with the United States Citizenship and Naturalization Services to host a naturalization ceremony at the park on Independence Day.
    For Saturday’s ceremony, 18 candidates from 9 countries, after working for years to fulfill their requirements, will be taking the oath and becoming the newest citizens of the United States.
    The candidates come from China, France, Iraq, Jordan, Mexico, the Phillipines, South Korea, Ukraine and Vietnam.
    The ceremony begins at noon behind the Bandelier Visitor Center. Keynote speakers will be noted author, poet, music teacher and Los Alamos Living Treasure Stephanie Sydoriak, herself an immigrant — originally from Ukraine in 1913— and Bandelier Superintendent Jason Lott.
    In addition, Michele Jacquez-Ortiz will also be speaking, representing New Mexico’s Congressional Delegation.
    Alicia Solomon, noted soloist with the Santa Fe Opera, Symphony and Desert Chorale,  will sing the National Anthem and Eagle Scouts from Troop 129 will parade the colors.
    Refreshments will be provided by the Rotary Club and there will be flags, gifts and flowers for the new citizens.

  • Elevator at Lodge under review

    The usually serene Fuller Lodge Historic District Advisory Board (FLHDAB) meeting was filled with roused citizens last month after a plan to install a glass and steel elevator on the outside of Fuller Lodge was announced.
    The board heard on an update on elevator options last night.
    The elevator was Mullen-Heller Architecture’s proposed solution for providing ADA (American with Disabilities Act) accessibility to the second floor. The architectural firm has been contracted to design a $3 million renovation for the lodge and the Los Alamos Historical Museum. The current elevator footprint is too small for ADA specifications.
    At last month’s meeting, the architects and Los Alamos County Project Manager Wayne Kohlrust explained the challenges of installing an inside elevator: reduced floor space in key rooms, major fire risers — part of the sprinkler system — running through potential locations and the possibility that the elevator would extend beyond the roof.

  • Today in history July 2
  • Update 7-1-15

    4th of July

    The Kiwanis Club will host its annual 4th of July event starting at 2 p.m. Saturday. It will be at Overlook Park in White Rock. A donation for admission is requested. Atomic City Transit buses will run from Sullivan Field and the White Rock Visitor Center to Overlook Park starting at 4 p.m.

    Walkup Center

    The Larry R. Walkup Center will be closed Friday, Saturday and Sunday in observance of Independence Day. The facility will reopen at 6 a.m. Monday.

    County Council

    Los Alamos County Council will have Its next regular meeting at 7 p.m. July 7. It will be in council chambers.

    Farmers Market

    Los Alamos Farmers Market will be Thursday at the Mesa Public Library parking lot. The market is from 7 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Helen Idzorek will host a talk about canning and drying food and homemade ice cream will be for sale starting at 10 a.m. until it’s gone.

    Future Energy

    The Future Energy Resources Committee will meet at 11:30 a.m. Thursday. The meeting will be in council chambers.

    TMNT

    Mesa Public Library will host a Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles group starting Monday. It is scheduled for 3 p.m. and is for kids ages 6-12. Call 662-8258 for information.

  • State Briefs 7-1-15

    Pojoaque governor: Compact would have resulted in layoffs

    POJOAQUE PUEBLO (AP) — The governor of Pojoaque Pueblo says his tribe refused to sign a gambling compact with the state because it amounted to what he called an illegal tax that would hurt tribal members and the surrounding community.
    Pojoaque Gov. Joseph Talachy contends the compact would have resulted in layoffs and cutting services to tribal members.
    The tribe’s gambling compact with the state expired at midnight Tuesday, but U.S. Attorney Damon Martinez is allowing Pojoaque’s casinos to remain open pending the outcome of a federal court case.
    Pojoaque was one of several tribes that participated in negotiations that led to a new gambling compact between the state and five other tribes, including the Navajo Nation. Pojoaque walked out of the negotiations in 2013, saying the state wasn’t negotiating in good faith.

    Thousands expected to converge on Roswell for UFO festival

  • Blue buses out of service on Friday

    The North Central Regional Transit District (NCRTD) announced that the RTD “Blue Buses” will not be in service on Friday, in observance of the Fourth of July holiday.
    Also, the RTD Taos Express will not be in service on Saturday.
    The Taos Express will be operating on its normal schedule on Sunday.
    The NCRTD operates transit systems around northern New Mexico, serving Los Alamos, Rio Arriba and surrounding counties.
     

  • Rock The Pond

    The Nukeproofs, a local punk and hard rock band, were the headline act at the Tuesday at the Pond show. They played several original songs, plus songs ranging from Nirvana to The Ramones to Johnny Cash. The Tuesdays at the Pond goes weekly through Aug. 11.

  • YMCA to host a parade for July 4 Saturday

    The Family YMCA will host its annual July 4 Kids Parade Saturday starting on Central Avenue.
    The YMCA, which will be busy for Independence Day, will start its parade at 10 a.m. Kids — and kids at heart — who want to participate in the parade are asked to assemble at the elephant statue at Ashley Pond prior to the start time.
    The parade route will take marchers along Central Avenue to 15th Street, ending at the YMCA’s building. The parade concludes with a flag-raising ceremony performed by the American Legion.
    Walkers, bikes, trikes and dogs on leashes — which are current with their vaccinations — are welcome to participate.
    Also on Saturday, prior to the Kids Parade, there will be the YMCA’s annual Firecracker 5K race.
    For more information about the events, call 662-3100.

  • Church construction is officially underway

    There were some mixed emotions expressed for members of the Unitarian Church at Tuesday’s groundbreaking ceremony.
    Officials from the church, which had been in the same building on North Sage Street — next door to the local Freemason’s building — since its founding, felt the structure had deteriorated to the point that it was no longer safe for the congregation.
    The decision was made to take the old building down, which was done last month, and start construction on the new building.
    “The building served its purpose for beyond its designated lifetime,” Galen Gisler said during the groundbreaking ceremony Tuesday evening. “We built many memories within these walls that have coming tumbling down a short time ago…but we will not miss the 1940s-style bathrooms.”
    Architects Mullen-Heller designed the new building, which Rev. John Cullinan said is scheduled to be completed in late summer of next year.
    Currently, the 150 members of the local Unitarian church, plus what Cullinan estimated is about 100 or so contributors and others associated with the church, are meeting at the TRK building on East Road.
    The new building will be L-shaped, as opposed to the old, multi-story building that was box-shaped. It will include a sanctuary, lobby and a full kitchen.

  • LACDC gets $10K grant from state

    New Mexico Economic Development Department (NMEDD) Cabinet Secretary Jon Barela announced Tuesday 15 rural economic development projects were selected to receive Local Economic Assistance & Development Support (LEADS).
    Among those getting awards were the Los Alamos Commerce and Development Corporation.
    The newly created LEADS program will leverage $176,260 to supplement the work of local communities in their efforts to diversify their economy and create good-paying jobs that have a multiplier effect, that according to a press release from the NMEDD.
    “New Mexico’s rural communities are resilient and showing great promise in their economic development efforts,” Barela said. “LEADS is a wonderful new tool to stimulate economic-base job growth by working strategically with these communities and together stretch limited resources.”
    Projects for LEADS can vary, but can include a sales mission or trade show, business visitation program, property site design, permitting and development plan or workforce development.
    LEADS, according to NMEDD, is a retooling of the current Certified Community Initiative (CCI) award process.
    The department referred to the selection process as “competitive” among those eligible entities applied for a grant.