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Local News

  • VIDEO: Obama says 'photo ops' won't solve border crisis
  • VIDEO: First person of world's tallest water slide
  • Today In History, July 10
  • Flood advisory in effect until 3:45 p.m.

     

    THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN ALBUQUERQUE HAS ISSUED AN

    * ARROYO AND SMALL STREAM FLOOD ADVISORY FOR... NORTHERN LOS ALAMOS COUNTY IN NORTH CENTRAL NEW MEXICO EXTREME SOUTHEASTERN RIO ARRIBA COUNTY IN NORTH CENTRAL NEW MEXICO NORTHEASTERN SANDOVAL COUNTY IN NORTH CENTRAL NEW MEXICO

    * UNTIL 345 PM MDT

    * AT 149 PM MDT NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE DOPPLER RADAR INDICATED HEAVY RAIN OVER NORTHERN PORTIONS OF THE LAS CONCHAS BURN SCAR INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO SANTA CLARA CANYON... RIO DEL OSO AND POSSIBLY CAMP MAY ROAD AND QUEMAZAN TRAIL. LOCAL RAINFALL AMOUNTS UP TO ONE INCH ARE POSSIBLE.

  • BPU head makes unprecedented move

    Board of Public Utilites Chair Timothy Neal, who was the only board member to vote against the new tiered water rate ordinance in its recommendation to council, took an unprecedented step during council's consideration of the ordinance on Tuesday.
    Neal asked council to ignore the board’s recommendation so that the new board being seated this month could revisit the issue. Three of the five board members are being replaced.
    Council asked Neal if he was speaking for the board or as a private citizen. It is not uncommon for board members to speak for or against a board recommendation during public comment, as private citizens. Neal voiced his opposition to the ordinance during public comment and former board member Steven Tenbrink and current member David Powell spoke in support of the recommendation.
    But during the presentation to council, Neal insisted he was speaking on behalf of the “new” board, which has not yet met, since they would be the ones required to implement the new ordinance.
    Councilors challenged Neal’s claim to be representing the board.

  • Unions give $180,000 to group for New Mexico races

    SANTA FE (AP) — Labor unions have contributed $180,000 to a Democratic-leaning political committee that can raise and spend unlimited amounts of money to influence legislative and other state races in New Mexico.
    The political action committee Patriot Majority New Mexico received $100,000 from an American Federation of Teachers’ political committee last month and $80,000 from a committee of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees in late May, according to the latest campaign finance reports.
    The PAC was a top spender in New Mexico’s fiercely contested legislative races two years ago when Democrats retained majorities in the House and Senate.
    Democrats have long controlled the Legislature but the GOP hopes to pick up enough seats in this year’s elections to gain a majority in the 70-member House for the first time in 60 years. Republicans could receive a boost from having GOP Gov. Susana Martinez running for re-election this year in much the same way Democrats benefited in 2012 from having President Barack Obama at the top of the ballot to draw voters to the polls.

  • Update 07-09-14

    Lecture

    Climate change discussion with Chick Keller. 7 p.m. Thursday at PEEC. No advance registration required. Free. For more information, visit PajaritoEEC.org, call 662-0460, or email Programs@PajaritoEEC.org.

    Horse show

    Los Alamos County Horse Show. 10 a.m. Saturday at Brewer Arena, North Mesa Rodeo Grounds. For cost and more information call 662-8170.

    No P and Z

    There will be no Planning and Zoning Commission meeting tonight, July 9th. The next meeting is scheduled for July 23. Also, the county announced that the council work session scheduled for July 15 has been canceled.

    Reception

    The Paintings of Ryszard Wasilewski. Opening Reception from 4:30-6:30 p.m. Friday. Upstairs in the Mesa Public Library Gallery. Daily through Aug. 5.

    Farmers Market

    Los Alamos Farmers Market. 7 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Thursday at the Mesa Public Library parking lot. Come get this season’s tomatoes. First drawing for the contest 10 a.m. July 17. 

  • International Folk Market opens today

    SANTA FE (AP) — Santa Fe’s famed summer market season opens this weekend with the International Folk Market, the world’s largest folk art market and one dedicated to helping artisans from impoverished nations start their own businesses.
    And as the popular market celebrates its 11th anniversary, it is drawing more than just tourists and locals. Organizers say designers from some of the most prestigious fashion brands are headed west to find inspiration for ethnographic prints and one-of-a-kindhandmade pieces that are increasingly popular in the fashion world.
    “We’ve had many fashion experts shop the market, visionary designers from Donna Karan, Yves Saint Laurent, Anthropologie, and Coach among them,” said market founder Judith Espinar. “We keep hearing that the market is a creativity hotspot, a place to exchange ideas and inspire and be inspired_for artists, retailers, collectors, and visitors alike.”
    This year, more than 160 artists from 62 countries will be selling their work, including includes scarves, jewelry, textiles, basket and host of other art pieces.

  • Funding set aside for Valles project

    Gov. Susana Martinez recently announced $6.2 million for watershed restoration on public lands throughout New Mexico. This funding will help restore and rehabilitate vulnerable watersheds throughout the state, improving water quality and quantity.
    “Unprecedented drought, wildfires, and flooding have decimated New Mexico’s watersheds,” Martinez said. “Water is our most precious natural resource, and we must take an active role in preserving it. By taking action now, we will not only help restore these vital areas for future generations, but we will also help improve the quality and availability of water, and support economic growth.
    Martinez signed this $6.2 million into law as part of the 2014 capital infrastructure legislation — which included an unprecedented $89 million worth of investment in water infrastructure throughout the state. The funding will treat approximately 7,700 acres of 14 high-priority watershed areas on public lands, as identified in the New Mexico Forest Action Plan.


    Martinez said last week she originally asked for $111 million.
    “They gave me $89 million and we prioritized with state forestry and vetted the projects in what needed to be protected,” she said.

  • Council OKs seasonal tiered water rates

    The Los Alamos County Council approved a new tiered water rate by a vote of 5-2 on Tuesday. The new rates go into effect immediately.
    The tiered rates now in effect are:
    • First Tier: $4.19 per 1000 gallons for the first 8,999 gallons consumed (same as current unit rate);
    • Second Tier: $4.45 per 1000 gallons for consumption between 9000 and 15,000 gallons; and
    • Third Tier: $5.32 per 1,000 gallons for all consumption above 15,000 gallons.
    The Department of Public Utilities had determined that a six-percent increase in revenue was necessary to address high capital and maintenance costs. DPU staff and the Board of Public Utilities spent months considering a change to a tiered water rate that more accurately allocates costs to high water users without unduly impacting users such as large families.
    Under the current flat rate, residents who used 4,000 to 4,500 gallons per month (the average use for all households during nonpeak months) pay the same rate for water as commercial users and residential customers using as much as 30,000 gallons a month.
    The new rates reflect the higher costs associated with high summer usage. DPU has found that 21 percent of the county’s households use nearly 56 percent of the water during peak months.