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Local News

  • White collar crime's a dirty business: FBI battles a state load of public corruption

    ALBUQUERQUE — Public officials who are successful, well-respected family men and women risk it all the day they act out of greed. When they cross that line, chances are better than good they will come to the attention of the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

    The abuse of power by public officials goes back a long way in this state, said Special Agent Marcus B. McCaskill, with the FBI’s White Collar Crime Program. Their motivation is a desire for more money, more power or both, McCaskill told participants at the FBI Citizens’ Academy Tuesday.

  • Spotlight on Los Alamos: Leadership program graduates ready to engage in community

    Inspiration was the order of the day when the Leadership Los Alamos Class of 2008 graduated from its eight-month course on Friday, engaged, committed and ready to make the community a better place.

    The 27 adult classmates, who came from all walks of life, ranged in age from their 20s to their 70s. With the addition of this group, there are now 137 people in the area who have considered the challenges faced by the community  through a series of seminars on the topics of youth, culture, education, government, economic development and the environment.

  • Who are your candidates?

    The June 3 primary election is looming large and leaving voters just weeks to analyze the candidates. The race for United States Senate is particularly important this political season because New Mexico will lose the powerful support of Sen. Pete Domenici on Dec. 31.Domenici has championed Los Alamos National Laboratory in Washington for more than three decades.

  • Earthquake ripples through local conference

    SANTA FE – Earthquake professionals attending an annual meeting here were not surprised to find their favorite subject leading national news reports around the country Friday morning.A magnitude 5.2 earthquake that struck southern Illinois at 4:37 MDT was felt throughout the region, but without much damage.“It always happens during these meetings,” said Susan Newman, executive director of the Seismological Society of America (SSA), as a three-day technical and scientific program drew to a close.The U.S.

  • Council bears down on budget plans

    County Council will meet Monday, Tuesday and Thursday ≠ this week, as well Wednesday, April 30, next week, at 7 p.m. in Council Chambers in the Community Building, 475 20th St.The first public hearing, Monday, will provide a budget overview and a discussion of capital projects. The remaining three meetings will discuss operating budgets of various departments and offices of county government.The process considers a biennial budget for fiscal year 2009 and 2010, although only the next year’s budget can be adopted according to state law.

  • Bear Camp registration draws 3 a.m. crowd

    Determined parents, some equipped with lawn chairs, braved the 3 a.m. darkness and cold air Friday to secure their children’s place in this summer’s Bear Camp. There are just 75 slots available in the 11-week program, open to youth entering K-6th grades in the fall.“I came in (to the Aquatic Center) at 5:30 a.m.

  • Wilson whirls through full agenda

    Throughout a day of meetings, media and mixers, Rep. Heather Wilson, R-N.M., listened to area concerns and shared her views on local and statewide issues. While visiting the Family YMCA, Wilson talked with staff and board members about youth issues and initiatives the organization is embracing.

  • Bandelier dedication marked by state award

    The cavates in Frijoles Canyon in Bandelier National Monument were listed on New Mexico’s most endangered list of historic places just 10 years ago. John Mack, Angelyn Bass Rivera and Lauren Meyer got busy and documented more than 1,000 cavates, drafted a conservation plan for Frijoles Canyon and developed new technology to conserve and further document the built heritage.Today, these well preserved and maintained small homes etched into steep tuff cliffs from 1100-1400 A.D.

  • Utilities' forecast looks stable; regular rate increases projected

    A woman recently called the Los Alamos utilities department, concerned about a large bill. Ordinarily, she used about 4,000 gallons of water each month, but after her old, inaccurate meter was replaced, her total shot up to 18,000 gallons, or about $50. County Conservation Officer Matt Dickens came to her house to see what he could do.It turned out the extra 14,000 gallons had leaked from two constantly running toilets.

  • Lab Notes: Supercomputer challengers come to town

    Students from around the state will visit Los Alamos Monday and Tuesday to face off for the New Mexico Supercomputing Challenge. Los Alamos National Laboratory will host more than 250 students from New Mexico’s high schools and middle schools. The occasion is the 18th Annual Supercomputing Challenge, the culmination of months of effort by the students and their teachers. Projects will be judged Monday and an awards ceremony will take place 9-11 a.m.