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Local News

  • Bob Everett Comer

    COMER – Bob Everett Comer, Versailles, Mo., died Saturday, June 28, 2008, at home. He was born Oct. 28, 1936, in Jefferson City, Mo., the son of Louis Bernard and Mary Katherine Lampson Comer. On Nov. 21, 1962, in Kansas City, Mo., he married Sandra Kaye Ball.

  • Not what but how

    The page is turning on the climate debate.

    In recent years and decades, the role of climate scientists was to convince policy-makers and the public that climate change was an issue.

    That mission has been largely accomplished, according to Guy Brasseur, a renowned modeler of atmospheric chemistry.

    He said the question now is about informing the social and political systems on how best to respond and predicting what effects any particular response might mean to the future.

  • Judicial/jail complex gets green light

    This time next year, if all goes as planned, the community will dedicate a new, security-compliant, energy-efficient (LEED Silver certified) Judicial/Police/Jail (JPJ) complex at the corner of Trinity and Oppenheimer drives.

    The Planning and Zoning Commission unanimously approved the site plan portion of the long-awaited project during its meeting at the Community Building Wednesday evening. Chair David Izraelevitz was absent.

  • Traveling the world in search of science

    After growing up in an academic realm immersed in science and technology, and living under a roof with two scientists he referred to as Mom and Dad, 23-year-old Los Alamos whiz kid Naveen Sinha has gotten to travel the world sharing his passion for science.

    Replace the rock star posters with vine-like strands of cable crawling up bookshelves stocked with sci-fi books and you’ve got a 17-year-old Sinha’s Los Alamos bedroom.

  • Days and nights of stars

    A series of evening lectures focusing on astronomy and space sciences continues today at Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Bradbury Science Museum.

    Astrophysicist Gabriel Rockefeller’s talk will focus on gamma-ray bursts, he said today, both the current state-of-the-art and also the relatively short history of rapidly accumulated knowledge.

    “How did we first discover this astrophysical phenomenon? How do the bursts form and what’s behind them?” he asked.

  • LAMC fined for improper waste disposal

    Improper disposal of infectious waste goes hand-in-hand with hefty fines from the New Mexico Environment Department.

    No place knows better than Los Alamos Medical Center, which was issued a $51,250 penalty by the state Tuesday for three violations of the Solid Waste Act occurring from October 2006 through January 2007.

    The inspections determined the hospital attempted to improperly dispose infectious waste at the county landfill – including two human placentas with attached umbilical cords, vials of blood, gauze, bedding, plastic tubing and needles.

  • County attorney's performance rewarded

    A salary increase and plenty of praise were showered on County Attorney Mary McInerny at Tuesday’s County Council meeting held in Council Chambers.

    Council voted 7-to-0 to approve minor adjustments to McInerny’s contract and to raise her annual salary from $128,000 to $135,000.

    Council Vice Chair Robert Gibson explained that McInerny was hired in the middle of the county’s current fiscal year.

  • School board nixes fine print

    Although the pending approval of a lease resolution with Los Alamos National Laboratory took up the bulk of Tuesday’s school board meeting, a presentation given by teachers of the Career Tech program at Los Alamos High School managed to steal the spotlight.

    Board members along with Charlotte Hetherington, a Santa Fe attorney hired by the district to bargain with LANL, protracted negotiations over existing sites that Los Alamos Public Schools leases to the lab, which include the Mesa, Pueblo, Pajarito and Canyon sites.

  • LANL nanotech greens company's business plan

    Manhattan Scientifics (MHTX) announced Tuesday that it was marketing NanoTitanium, the company’s proprietary nanostructured metal. The material came out of a post-cold-war collaboration between atomic weapons scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and Russian counterparts.

    On July 2, Manahattan Scientifics held a press conference in Albuquerque where company officials were joined by a delegation of state political figures to announce the acquisition of Metallicum.

  • Frank William Reeves

    REEVES – Frank William Reeves, son of Frank Ira Reeves and Louise (Zach) Reeves was born July 4, 1926, in Madison, Neb., and passed away July 3, 2008, in Mt. Vernon Veterans Home, Mt. Vernon, Mo., at age 81, three hours short of his 82 birthday. Frank had been a resident of Ava since 1981.