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Local News

  • Schools’ lobbyist discloses special legislative session

    Lobbyist Scott Scanland told local school board members and district administrators Tuesday evening that Gov. Richardson intends to call a special session in October.

    Scanland, whose  annual $10,000 lobbying contract was unanimously approved during the meeting, explained that Richardson and legislative leaders in the House and Senate agreed to call a special session of the legislature, probably in October.

  • July was a good monsoon month

    Los Alamos County had rain on 20 days in July, so the monsoon appeared to be in full swing. But how much the monsoon is to be credited for the rain is questionable.

    Indeed, the first major storms of the month, which brought a combined 1.3 inches of rain on July 5th and 6th and the largest hail this meteorologist has ever seen, had perfect monsoon conditions associated with them.

  • Hard labor pays off for YCC

    A slight breeze brought much needed relief to members of the Youth Conservation Corps Friday, as they took a short break from their laborious work on the county’s trail system.

     

    Two groups gathered under a couple of small trees, enjoying the little bit of shade the trees provided. Some sipped from their water bottles, while others just sat and enjoyed the time away from working.

     

  • Community reflects on an exemplary life

    Dr. James E. Loucks gave birth to some 7,500 babies during his distinguished career as an obstetrician-gynecologist. One of the founding fathers of Los Alamos as a self-governing entity, Loucks died Aug. 1.

    People who knew him, generations of people he literally brought into the world and people who were touched by his generosity and spirit have been reminded again what a special person he was and what a profound loss the community now suffers.

    The doctor and his family

  • County fair offers food, fun and festivities

    Ashley Pond was the place to be on Saturday for food, fun and entertainment. There was a little something for everyone at the pond, as Los Alamos County residents came out in droves to take part in the festivities associated with the Los Alamos County Festival, Fair and Rodeo.

     

    Crowds in search of their favorites such as Haagen Dazs and kettle corn crowded around vendor booths in search of their food fix.

     

  • There are currently several nails in the coffin of a nuclear policy that has strongly favored commercial reprocessing and recycling of plutonium. Ivan Oelrich wants to make sure it doesn’t pop open again.

    A recurring idea in the political tug-of-war between proponents and opponents of nuclear energy, nuclear reprocessing is intended to achieving a plutonium fuel cycle, and thereby provide a plentiful supply of nuclear fuel and a more easily-stored waste product.

  • Talk on Thursday focuses on plutonium reprocessing

    There are currently several nails in the coffin of a nuclear policy that has strongly favored commercial reprocessing and recycling of plutonium. Ivan Oelrich wants to make sure it doesn’t pop open again.

    A recurring idea in the political tug-of-war between proponents and opponents of nuclear energy, nuclear reprocessing is intended to achieving a plutonium fuel cycle, and thereby provide a plentiful supply of nuclear fuel and a more easily-stored waste product.

  • Records management could see some relief

    Finding a public record should be quite easy, assuming they are neatly organized and easily accessible. That however, is not the case for the County of Los Alamos.

    Thousands of boxes stacked on top of each other fill the county’s annex warehouse. Inside, records dating back to the 1940s lay there, collecting dust. In addition, about one-third of those records have been recognized as past retention.

  • Peace in the Valley

    COMMON GROUND Bob Parmenter, chief scientist of the Valles Caldera National Preserve said he will work with the WildEarth Guardians Saturday on a fence removal project involving 14 miles of old sheep fence and unnecessary barbed-wire fences on the preserve. In order to reduce impacts on wildlife movements (especially elk calves that can’t get through sections of the fences). Some of this sheep fence (net wire) has been on the Preserve for nearly a century and serves no purpose now – hence, the need to remove it. 

  • County to apply for broadband funding

    An item placed on the consent agenda and slated for quick approval was pulled and put on the regular agenda for discussion during Tuesday night’s county council meeting.

    Councilor Ralph Phelps pulled the item pertaining to the approval to submit an application for a broadband infrastructure grant under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, for further discussion.

    Members of the Regional Economic Development Initiative have identified broadband as northern New Mexico’s number one infrastructure priority.