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Local News

  • County to tackle gopher problem

    Some furry, and seemingly unwanted, tenants have inhabited the ball fields around Los Alamos and now officials are holding a meeting to discuss how they should be eradicated.

    Gophers have taken up residence in ball fields, posing a danger to those who use the fields, officials report. Not only is it possible for users to trip and fall because of gopher holes, but also the possibility of contracting a disease, such as plague, from infected gophers is also possible.

  • Caldera audits square old accounts

    When Congress established the Valles Caldera National Preserve in 2000 as an independent government agency, it probably didn’t mean that their creation would be financially unaccountable during its first nine years.

     

    But one thing led to another and nine years later the governing board of trustees has finally completed audits for a period of three of those years, from 2004-2007.

     

  • Celebrate National Trails Day

    Los Alamos County Parks Division will sponsor a community trail maintenance workshop and kick off its new Adopt-A-Trail program on June 6, in celebration of National Trails Day.

    National Trails Day is a celebration of trail systems across the nation and this year will mark the 17th year of nationwide trail user participation and awareness, improvement and enjoyment of trails.

  • Lab highlights distinguished innovations

    The seekers and finders of technological advances at Los Alamos National Laboratory celebrated another year of ingenuity Tuesday evening at Fuller Lodge.

    “What I’ve enjoyed most about interactions with scientists and engineers at the lab is how excited they get about their technologies,” said Bill Enloe, chairman and CEO of Los Alamos National Bank, who gave a keynote talk to more than a hundred people gathered for the occasion.

  • Iran, A Country That’s More Than Nuclear

    The United States does not know enough about Iran, a nuclear proliferation expert said Thursday.

    Arvid Lundy, a Los Alamos National Laboratory retiree who has focused on Iran in recent years, said the United States does “not have adequate understanding of the country,” and that a greater understanding of Iranian culture was needed.

  • Records Administrator finds joy in her job

    Anyone who’s kept receipts and paper records over a long period of time knows how easy it is to accumulate them and how hard it is to weed through them and sort them out.

    Imagine having 6,000 containers full of not just paper records, but other miscellaneous items, that need to be looked through.

  • Suspected murderer turns himself in

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — A man suspected of fatally shooting a pregnant teenager and her father in a Santa Fe apartment surrendered to police in Los Alamos Saturday night.

    Santa Fe Deputy Police Chief Aric Wheeler says 22-year-old Marino K. Leyba Jr. of Santa Fe turned himself in Saturday after police said he was wanted for the shootings of 17-year-old Sarah Marie Lovato and 50-year-old Benny Ray Lovato Sr.

    Leyba and his attorney Yvonne K. Quintana arrived at the Los Alamos Police Department shortly after 8 p.m. so Leyba could turn himself in.

  • Youth and Technology Project underway in Los Alamos

    Two journalism students from Syracuse University are in town through Sunday working on a Carnegie-Knight initiative on the future of journalism called “News21.”

    The Carnegie and Knight Foundations have funded 12 journalism schools to participate in the project with the hope the schools can help journalism make the transition into the digital age.

    News21 has teamed with a “Christian Science Monitor” project called “Patchwork Nation” that is exploring 11 different types of American communities, which includes Los Alamos.

  • Memorial Day

    This year’s Memorial Day community celebration was again held at Guaje Pines Cemetery on Monday. Guest of honor and speaker was Michael Wismer, USAF (ret.), and current vice chair of the county council. A large growd gathered to honor the millions of Americans who gave their lives for our freedoms. Post Commander, Lt. Col. Bill Cooper (ret.), addresses the crowd. The event was a joint community presentation organized by a variety of service organizations, including the American Legion, the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 8874, Elks B.P.O.E.

  • Senators draw attention to mysterious illness

    The Senate unanimously passed legislation introduced by Sen. Tom Udall, D-N.M., to take a first step toward boosting research and education efforts related to Cerebral Cavernous Malformation (CCM).

    CCM is a relatively unknown illness more prevalent among New Mexico Hispanics than any other group.