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Local News

  • Shutdown looms without agreement

    WASHINGTON — A deadline looming, Congress’ top Democrat accused Republicans on Friday of risking a government shutdown because they want to make it harder “for women to get cancer screenings.”
    Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid unleashed his attack as his main antagonist in long-running negotiations, Speaker John Boehner, said spending cuts —not social issues — was blocking agreement to prevent a shutdown at midnight.
    The maneuvering unfolded as President Barack Obama canceled a trip to Indianapolis and spoke in separate phone calls with Reid and Boehner.

  • MIG provides N.M. 502 study update

    It was a full house Thursday night at Fuller Lodge for the transportation board meeting and public hearing on the N.M. 502 Corridor Study.

    Residents filled the seats to hear about the study and give their opinions on the preferred alternatives being explored to improve the road.

    MIG, the consulting firm conducting the study, is expected to complete the final report on the recommended improvements to N.M. 502 Corridor in September.

  • Sydoriak shares her culture with Los Alamos

    Editor’s note: This is the second in a three-part series featuring the newest additions to the Living Treasures.
     
    On April 17 William “Bill” Chambers, Morris “Morrie” Pongratz and Stephanie Sydoriak will be recognized and honored as the newest members of Living Treasures of Los Alamos. The ceremony and reception, sponsored by Los Alamos National Bank, will begin at 2 p.m. at the Betty Ehart Senior Center. The public is invited to attend.

    Stephanie Sydoriak

  • Congress doesn't shut down during a shutdown

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Senators would have to push their own elevator buttons. House members would go without their free gym. Food on Capitol Hill would be sparse. And the lawmakers' restrooms? Perhaps not as fresh.

    Congress would feel the pinch of a government shutdown, but nowhere near the pain that would be inflicted on the massive federal work force it is supposed to govern.

  • Cleveland airport evacuated amid screening glitch

    CLEVELAND (AP) — A bag screening machine is blamed for an evacuation and delays at Cleveland's main airport.

    Cleveland Hopkins airport spokeswoman Jackie Mayo says the entire airport was cleared around 5:30 Friday morning when screeners at a checkpoint realized the machine was giving them a static image, not an accurate look at the contents of carry-on bags.

    Mayo says the 45-minute evacuation was undertaken as a precaution so a security sweep could be done. Passengers and their bags were then allowed back in to be rescreened.

  • Israeli army strikes Gaza after school bus hit

    JERUSALEM (AP) — Israeli aircraft and ground forces struck Gaza on Friday, killing three Hamas militants and three civilians in a surge of fighting sparked by a Palestinian rocket attack on an Israeli school bus the day before.

    Israel and Gaza's Hamas rulers seemed on the brink of another round of intense violence, just a little over two years after persistent rocket fire from Gaza triggered a devastating Israeli military offensive in the territory.

  • Japan aftershock raises anxiety, knocks out power

    ICHINOSEKI, Japan (AP) — Shoppers emptied store shelves, traffic snarled after stoplights lost power and drivers waited in long lines to buy gasoline in a new wave of anxiety Friday after a magnitude-7.1 aftershock struck disaster-weary northeastern Japan.

    Nearly a half-million homes were without electricity after the latest tremor, which dealt another setback for those struggling to recover from the earthquake-spawned tsunami that wiped out hundreds of miles of the northeastern coast last month and killed as many as 25,000 people.

  • APNewsBreak: IRS awards $4.5M to whistleblower

    PHILADELPHIA (AP) — An in-house accountant who raised a red flag about a tax lapse that his employer then ignored, leading him to tip off the IRS, has received $4.5 million in the first IRS whistleblower award.

    The accountant's tip netted the IRS $20 million in taxes and interest from the errant financial-services firm.

    The award represents a 22 percent cut of the taxes recovered. The program, designed to encourage tips in large-scale cases, mandates awards of 15 to 30 percent of the amount recouped.

  • Million homes lack power after new Japan quake--video extra

    SENDAI, Japan (AP) — Nearly a million homes suffered blackouts in Japan's northeast Friday after a new earthquake killed three people and piled more misery on a region buried under the rubble of last month's devastating tsunami.

    The northeastern coast was still reeling from the destruction wrought by a jumbo 9.0-magnitude earthquake on March 11, with tens of thousands of households without power or water. The 7.1-magnitude aftershock Thursday threw even more areas into disarray and sent communities that had made some gains back to square one.

    Gasoline was scarce again, and long lines formed at stations. Stores that had only recently restocked their shelves sold out of basics Friday and were forced to ration purchases again.

  • Poll: Few confident US ready for nuclear emergency

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Most Americans doubt the U.S. government is prepared to respond to a nuclear emergency like the one in Japan, a new Associated Press-GfK poll shows. But it also shows few Americans believe such an emergency would occur.

    Nevertheless, the disaster has turned more Americans against new nuclear power plants. The poll found that 60 percent of Americans oppose building more nuclear power plants. That's up from 48 percent who opposed it in an AP-Stanford University Poll in November 2009.