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Local News

  • Breaking News: Former LANL Director Sig Hecker receives 2009 Enrico Fermi Award

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  • The decline of crime even in tough economic times

    Unemployment, interest rates, stress – they’re all on the rise as the economy is buffeted by a downturn. What’s not rising, however, is crime, according to statistics compiled by the FBI that show violent crimes and property crimes declined nationwide in 2008.

  • ALERT: DOH confirms 21-year-old Los Alamos woman who died Sunday from the H1N1 virus had no underlying health problems

    The New Mexico Department of Health has confirmed the 21-year-old Los Alamos woman who died Sunday from the H1N1 influenza had no underlying health problems.

    She is the third woman to die from the virus in New Mexico this year and the only person without existing health issues prior to contracting H1N1, according to DOH.

    The New Mexico Department of Health  is preparing to respond to the influenza.

  • Council adopts 36 percent property tax hike

    County councilors expressed surprise and dismay when realization hit that they must approve a 36 percent property tax increase that will affect residents in November.

    “During the annual budget cycle council can increase or decrease the rate and council did not make any change to that last budget cycle,” Chief Financial Officer Steve Lynne said. “The last formal action council took on mill levy rates was in 1992.”

    Read the full story in today's Los Alamos Monitor.

  • Breaking News: DOH just confirmed first H1N1 death in Los Alamos County

    Breaking News: New Mexico Department of Health just confirmed the death of a 21-year-old Los Alamos woman from the H1N1 influenza.

    Few details are being released as the DOH is investigating whether the woman had underlying health problems that may have contributed to her death.

     

  • Breaking News: Tony Mortillaro named county administrator

    In a 6-1 vote this evening, county councilors appointed current assistant administrator Anthony Mortillaro to replace County Administrator Max Baker when he retires Oct. 21.

    Read the full story in Wednesday’s Los Alamos Monitor.

  • Community event features superintendent

    Superintendent Gene Schmidt joked that he felt a little nervous about attending an event he described as a “meet, greet and eat” Tuesday evening at Fuller Lodge.

    Despite any jittery feelings, Schmidt said, “I’m delighted to be here.”

    The community get-together, he explained, is an opportunity to learn more about Los Alamos. “I can not know Los Alamos unless I know you,” he said.

  • Changes in vaccination schedule coming

    Business Manager John Wolfe of Los Alamos Public Schools participated in a H1N1 conference call Monday geared specifically for all district and charter schools around the state.

    Public Education Department Cabinet Secretary Veronica Garcia, Homeland Security and Emergency Management Cabinet Secretary John Wheeler and New Mexico Department of Health officials reiterated information continually distributed on cough etiquette, hand washing and the ill remaining at home for 24 hours following their last fever without medication.  

  • Police Beat

    Police Beat items are compiled from public information contained in Los Alamos Police Department Records. Charges or citations listed in Police Beat do not imply innocence or guilt.

    Sept. 10

    2:03 p.m. – Michelle Pinkerton, 31, of Los Alamos was arrested in Santa Fe on a Magistrate Court bench warrant out of Los Alamos.

    8 p.m. – A 40-year-old Los Alamos man reported his money stolen from a locker at Fire Station #5. The estimated loss is $86.

    Sept. 11

  • H1N1 flu virus shown to be different from seasonal influenza

    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Autopsies on people who have died from the new pandemic H1N1 flu show this virus is different from seasonal influenza, even if it has not yet caused more deaths, experts told a meeting on Tuesday.

    Americans who died from swine flu had infections deep in their lungs, Dr. Sherif Zaki of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention told a meeting of flu experts, including damage to the alveoli – the structures in the lung that deliver oxygen to the blood.