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Local News

  • Granich Trial Update: Jury sent home Friday

    Jurors in the State v. Penny Granich trial stopped deliberating at about midnight Friday after a juror fell ill.

    Officials explain that the jury had intended to continue deliberating until one of its member began to feel ill. The jury was dismissed and because of today's Columbus Day holiday, were told to reconvene at 8 a.m. Tuesday.

    Check back here often for updates on this trial.

  • Attorneys attack crash data during Granich trial

    SANTA FE – Much of Monday’s opening remarks surrounded the reliability of the crash reconstruction methods used at the scene and in the days following the death of Thomas Edward Granich, 32, on Dec. 4, 2005.

      The state is prosecuting the victim’s wife, Penny Granich, 35, on charges of vehicular homicide, reckless driving and driving under the influence of alcohol.

  • Judge refuses to drop charges

    SANTA FE – The jury left the room before attorney Mark Donatelli asked District Judge Michael Vigil late Thursday to dismiss all charges against his client Penny Granich.

    The 35-year-old Los Alamos woman is charged with vehicular homicide, reckless driving and driving under the influence of alcohol.

    Prosecutor Carlos Gutierrez spoke against Donatelli’s request after spending the entire week laying out his case that Penny drove her husband Thomas Edward Granich into a 350-foot canyon near Overlook Park in White Rock early on Dec. 4, 2005.

  • Lujan named amongst influentials

    Hispanic Business Magazine has named Rep. Ben Ray Luján, D-N.M., one of the 100 most influential Hispanics, as part of its annual list. The list includes leaders in business, law, media and education, as well as politics and other fields.  

    “It is an honor to be recognized with such a prestigious group of influential Hispanic leaders. We’re all doing what we believe is right to make things better for other people and for the country,” Luján said during an interview from Washington, D.C. Friday.   

  • The pursuit of an older female

    What may be one of the hottest science stories of the year involves a well-known local scientist, who will be featured in a documentary on the Discovery Channel (Channel 51 locally) at 7 p.m.

    Of special interest is the role of a Los Alamos geologist, Giday WoldeGabriel, co-director of an ongoing investigation in the Afar Rift of Ethiopia that has uncovered the remains of a new human ancestor.

    “This time it is very old, 4.4 million years,” said WoldeGabriel in an interview Thursday.

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  • Breaking News: Judge refuses to drop charges against Penny Granich

  • Turning algae into energy

    As part of a project to create alternative sources of energy, researchers at Sandia National Laboratories are cultivating green algae that holds promise as a new supply of biofuel.

    “People have been growing algae for centuries for food supplements for use by man and animals,” Project Leader Cecelia Williams said. “It now has the potential to supply our energy needs, too.”

  • Former employee indicted

    Following a lengthy FBI investigation, a U.S. District Court grand jury Thursday indicted former Los Alamos National Laboratory employee Alex Maestas.

    According to court documents, Maestas is facing two Level 4 offenses. Count one references the theft of government property and count two involves the theft of nuclear material.

    Last March LANL’s multiple layers of security at the Plutonium Processing Facility at Technical Area 55 where Maestas worked stopped the alleged theft.

  • Web site reveals flu myths and facts

    Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius Wednesday unveiled several new resources on the federal governmentís one-stop resource for flu information at www.flu.gov.

    The Web site now features a new H1N1 Flu Self-Evaluation guide for adults 18 and older along with a new Flu Myths and Facts section, which provides the public with the latest and most accurate information about the flu.