Local News

  • CIP committee to hear phase 2 applications

    The county’s Capital Improvement Program (CIP) Evaluation and Oversight Committee will conduct a public hearing at 5:15 p.m. Thursday in council chambers for those applicants who have indicated that they are ready to move from Phase 1, a study, to Phase 2, construction.
    The county has received Phase 2 applications for these two projects:
    • Fuller Lodge, Art Center and historical museum improvements
    • Aquatic Center Leisure Pool

  • Officials: Chance of radiation hurting NM remote

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — State emergency management officials say the possibility of airborne radiation from Japan causing health problems in New Mexico is extremely remote.

    The state's secretary of homeland security and emergency management, Michael Duvall, says federal agencies don't expect to see radiation at harmful levels reaching any part of the United States from Japan.

  • Fed clears way for some banks to boost dividends

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve on Friday cleared the way for some major banks to boost stock dividends, prompting announcements from JPMorgan Chase, Wells Fargo and U.S. Bancorp.

    JPMorgan Chase said it is increasing its dividend to 25 cents a share from 5 cents, Wells Fargo hiked its dividend to 12 cents a share from 5 cents and U.S. Bancorp boosted its dividend.

  • With aid slow to come Japanese fend for themselves

    KARAKUWA, Japan (AP) — There may be no water, no power and no cell phone reception in this tsunami-struck town, but in the school that serves as a shelter, there are sizzling pans of fat, pink shrimp.

    Relief supplies have only trickled into the long strip of northeast Japan demolished by a powerful earthquake and the wave it unleashed a week ago, leaving affected communities to fend for themselves.

  • Crises in Japan, Gulf thwart US energy accord

    WASHINGTON (AP) — On the road to a national energy policy, President Barack Obama is hitting pothole after pothole.

    First, worries over coal-burning plants' role in global warming prompted Obama and other Democrats to look more favorably on offshore oil and gas exploration. Last year's BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico abruptly ended that.

  • Japan official: Disasters overwhelmed government

    TOKYO (AP) — The Japanese government acknowledged Friday that it was overwhelmed by the scale of last week's twin natural disasters, slowing the response to the nuclear crisis that was triggered by the earthquake and tsunami that left at least 10,000 people dead.

    The admission came as Japan welcomed U.S. help in stabilizing its overheated, radiation-leaking nuclear complex, and reclassified the rating of the nuclear accident from Level 4 to Level 5 on a seven-level international scale, putting it on a par with the 1979 Three Mile Island accident.

  • Japan raises severity of nuclear accident

    TOKYO (AP) — Japan's nuclear safety agency raised the severity rating of the country's nuclear crisis Friday from Level 4 to Level 5 on a seven-level international scale, putting it on par with the Three Mile Island accident in Pennsylvania in 1979.

  • UN approves no-fly zone over Libya

    UNITED NATIONS (AP) — The U.N. Security Council on Thursday approved a no-fly zone over Libya and authorized "all necessary measures" to protect civilians from attacks by Moammar Gadhafi's forces.

    The action came as the Libyan leader was poised to make a final push against rebels holding out in Bengazhi, Libya's second largest city.

    The vote in the 15-member council was 10-0 with five abstentions, including Russia and China.

    The United States, France and Britain had pushed for speedy approval.

  • NM House turns down Senate's budget-balancing bill

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — With adjournment looming, the Legislature still hasn't agreed on all the pieces of a more than $5 billion state budget package.

    The House and Senate must work out their differences on a measure that saves nearly $111 million next year to help balance the budget. It requires state workers and educators to pay more into their pensions while government reduces its payroll contributions by a similar amount. The bill also will delay higher state payments to shore up the retirement fund for public school employees and college faculty.

  • Japan asks for US help in nuclear crisis

    YAMAGATA, Japan (AP) — Japan reached out Friday to the U.S. for help in stabilizing its overheated, radiation-leaking nuclear complex, while the U.N. atomic energy chief called the disaster a race against the clock that demands global cooperation.

    At the stricken complex, military fire trucks again sprayed the troubled reactor units for a second day, with tons of water arcing over the facility in desperate attempts to prevent the fuel from overheating and spewing dangerous levels of radiation.