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Local News

  • Japan nuclear emergency workers to return to plant

    FUKUSHIMA, Japan— Emergency workers forced to retreat from a tsunami-stricken Japanese nuclear power plant when radiation levels soared prepared to return Wednesday night after emissions dropped to safer levels.
    The pullback cost precious time in the fight to prevent a nuclear meltdown, further escalating a crisis spawned by last week’s devastating earthquake and tsunami that pulverized Japan’s northeastern coast and likely killed more than 10,000 people.

  • Update 03-16-11

    DPU meeting
    The regular meeting of the Board of Utilities will be at 5:30 p.m. today at the DPU Conference Room at 170 Central Park Square.

    CIP business
    The CIP Business Meeting will be at 5:15 p.m. Thursday night at the Community Building Council Chambers.

    ESB Board meeting
    Environmental Sustainability Board will meet at 7 a.m. Thursday at the Eco Station Administration Building. 

    Council meetings

  • LANB treads cautiously on film-related loans

    Los Alamos National Bank declined a $20 million loan to Masque Entertainment that had been requested for construction of a post-production facility project in the Santa Fe Railyard.
    Executive Director Richard Czoski of the Santa Fe Railyard Community Corporation said this morning that his organization has been working with Masque Entertainment chief Steve Perry for nearly 18 months.

  • United Way recognition dinner

    Members of the United Way of Northern New Mexico got together for an appreciation dinner at De Colores Tuesday.

  • Public calls for action in council's strategic plans

    When it comes to the county council’s strategic planning, the public and councilors alike can agree it’s time for action.

    During a public listening session Tuesday night at Fuller Lodge, several participants urged the council to stop the trend of ongoing planning and start the process of implementation.

    In January, the council met with county staff and facilitator Carl Neu to develop a vision for the future, strategic focus areas and five-year goals.

  • Hope and loss in Japan's search for 8,000 missing

    NATORI, Japan (AP) — Line after line, a list on the wall of city hall reveals the dead. Some are named. Others are identified only by a short description.

    Female. About 50. Peanuts in left chest pocket. Large mole. Seiko watch.

    Male. 70-80 years old. Wearing an apron that says "Rentacom."

    One set catches the eye of Hideki Kano, a man who appears to be in his 30s.

    "I think that's my mom!" he says. He rushes out into the snow, headed for a makeshift morgue.

  • More governments advising citizens to leave Tokyo

    TOKYO (AP) — Australia advised its citizens in Japan on Wednesday to consider leaving Tokyo and earthquake-affected areas, joining a growing number of governments and businesses telling their people it may be safer elsewhere.

    The Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade said in a travel advice update that Australians with no need to be in the area should think about leaving but added that the decision had nothing to do with the threat of nuclear contamination from a damaged nuclear power plant.

  • Official defends new consumer bureau against GOP

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Obama administration official assembling the new federal agency overseeing credit cards, mortgages and other financial products is rebuffing banking industry claims that the agency is too powerful and lacks accountability.

    Elizabeth Warren, who is putting together the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, is also giving little ground against Republicans who say she's played an inappropriate role as federal agencies and states try pressuring big U.S. banks to overhaul how they modify mortgages and handle foreclosures.

  • Japan prepares to restart work at nuclear plant

    FUKUSHIMA, Japan (AP) — Surging radiation levels forced Japan to order emergency workers to temporarily withdraw from its crippled nuclear plant Wednesday, losing time in a desperate operation to cool the overheating reactors — the most urgent crisis from last week's devastating earthquake and tsunami.

    The technicians were dousing the nuclear reactors with seawater in a frantic effort to cool them when they had to retreat in the late morning. The plant's operator ordered the technicians back to the site in the evening after radiation levels subsided.

  • Japan tsunami: Nothing to do but run

    SHIZUGAWA, Japan (AP) — Growing up in this small fishing town on Japan's northeastern coast, 16-year-old Minami Sato never took the annual tsunami drills seriously.

    She thought the town's thick, two-story-high harbor walls would protect against any big wave. Besides, her home was perched on a hilltop more than a mile (about two kilometers) from the water's edge. It was also just below a designated "tsunami refuge" — an elevated patch of grass that looked safely down across the town's highest four-story buildings.