Local News

  • College students get hard lessons in finance

    WASHINGTON (AP) — In these tight times, college students are getting a lesson in economics no matter what their major. Students say money influences everything from what school they attend and what career they pursue to how quickly they complete their degrees — or whether they graduate at all.

    Money problems, not bad grades, are the reason cited by most college students who have considered dropping out, an Associated Press-Viacom poll finds.

  • Careful search for mementos slows Japan's rebuilding

    KESENNUMA, Japan (AP) — Sakuji Funayama watched intently as a giant steel claw tore chunks off the remains of his two-story home, ripped open like a dollhouse by last month's tsunami and washed up onto a pile of debris. Suddenly, he spied something, waved his arms and pointed.

    The claw froze and a half dozen construction workers scrambled into the wreckage, emerging a few minutes later with a battered backpack that belonged to Funayama's son, who moved away years ago. He set it off to the side.

  • Day of remembrance: 1 year after Gulf oil disaster

    NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Relatives of some of the 11 men who died aboard the Deepwater Horizon oil rig are flying over the Gulf of Mexico on Wednesday, back to the epicenter of the worst offshore oil spill in the nation's history.

    Meanwhile, on land, vigils were scheduled in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida to mark the spill.

  • Storm's human, financial toll rises in Raleigh, NC

    RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — The tornado that carved through North Carolina's capital killed four children, shuttered a university for the rest of the spring semester and felled the signature trees in the metropolis known as the "City of Oaks."

    It was the most active system of tornadoes on record in the state's history, leading to 23 deaths. In Raleigh, one of the nation's fastest-growing cities, the death toll and property damages underscored the massive costs that can be inflicted when a tornado makes a rare venture into areas of dense population.

    In all, the storm killed 45 people in six states, but North Carolina was by far the hardest-hit.

  • D. Ray Smith to speak about Oak Ridge

    D. Ray Smith, historian at the Y-12 plant in Oak Ridge, Tenn., shares stories from the earliest white settlement in the land of the Cherokee to the removal of 3,000 farmers to make way for the most significant military and industrial achievement in history, to modern day applications of the technological advances of the nuclear era.  As he spins legends and tales, Smith shares historic photographs from Manhattan Project photographer Ed Westcott, as well as humorous interludes to look at the lighter side of history.

  • Update 04-19-11

    DPU meeting
    The Department of Public Utilities (DPU) board will meet at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday at the DPU conference room. 

    Dem Party meeting
    The Democratic Party of Los Alamos County will host its monthly meeting from 7-30 p.m. Thursday at the Mesa Public Library meeting room 3.

    GOP meeting
    The Republican Party of Los Alamos County will meet Thursday at 7:30 p.m. at the Best Western Hilltop Hotel.

    ESB meeting
    The Environmental Sustainability Board will host a meeting at 7 a.m. Thursday at the Eco Station Administration Building.

  • Local CEO receives Patriot Award

    Employer Support of the Guard and Reserves (ESGR) presented Bill Enloe of Los Alamos National Bank with its highest honor – the Patriot Award.
    Enloe was recognized during a special ceremony Monday for the support he affords his employees who are called to serve on military tours.
    LANB employee John Brunett is a captain in the National Guard. He nominated Enloe for the award, officially called the “Office of the Secretary of Defense Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Patriotic Employer Award.”
    “Bill is a great guy and has treated me very well in regards to my involvement with the Guard … he certainly deserves this award,” said Brunett who left recently for a five-month stint in Kosovo.

  • Study assesses potential impact of quake at LA

    Los Alamos National Laboratory officials are looking at ways to strengthen the structure of its plutonium processing building in response to a study that shows it would be vulnerable to significant damage in the event of a major earthquake.
    LANL adopted an updated site-wide seismic hazard analysis standard in 2007. In response to that effort, LANL's Seismic Analysis of Facilities and Evaluation of Risk (SAFER) Project has been conducting a detailed multiyear analysis of the seismic design loads on every existing facility at the site. New or proposed facilities are designed to meet the latest seismic response criteria.

  • $20 million for CIPs gains tacit approval

    The Los Alamos County Council earmarked just shy of $20 million for an aggressive slate of capital projects which were tentatively approved during budget hearings Saturday. Another hearing also took place Monday.

    Council gave a tentative nod to spend $19.5 million for the Capital Improvement Project (CIP) program in FY 2012. The motion passed 6-1, with Councilor Vincent Chiravalle opposed.

    Council will consider adopting the FY 2012 budget during its May 3l meeting.

  • LTAB's small project grants available

    The Request for Proposal (RFP) for the Lodgers’ Tax Advisory Board’s (LTAB’s) Small Project Grants was issued Monday for public response.  
    The RFP/application was e-mailed to past and interested participants and is currently available for download on the web page, www.losalamosnm.us/gov/bcc.  
    The Small Project Grants program is a funding initiative conducted annually by LTAB to support local events whose organizers’ marketing efforts seek to encourage visitation from outside a 75-radius around Los Alamos.  
    Proposers whose projects are selected for funding must provide receipts of their promotion efforts (advertisements, flyer duplication and other items) for reimbursement.