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Local News

  • Transit agency changes afternoon routes

    The Atomic City Transit Afternoon Express Routes that pick-up students at each of the Elementary Schools and the Middle School each weekday after school have been adjusted for the coming school year. Visit www.AtomicCityTransit.com to view an updated schedule. If you have any questions or concerns, call 661-RIDE (7433) or send an email to lacpw@lacnm.us.

  • Update 08-17-11

    FEED meeting

     Forum for Environmental Education and Dialogue (FEED) will meet at 5:30 p.m. Thursday at Pojoaque Valley School Administration Building.

    DPU meeting

     The Board of Utilities will meet at 5:30 p.m. today in the Department of Utilities conference room, 170 Central Park Square.

    Thank you event

     The county council, LANL and NNSA are hosting an event to thank all of those who helped the community through the fire from 4-6 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 25 at Ashley Pond.

    Pool maintenance

  • Decision by EPA may cause DPU rates to rise

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) determined last week that PNM must install select catalytic reduction technology (SCR) on all four units of the San Juan Generating Station within five years.

    The decision, if it stands, is estimated to increase electricity rates for Los Alamos residents by approximately 11 percent.

    The Los Alamos Department of Public Utilities (DPU) owns approximately seven percent of the generating plant’s Unit 4, which provides 36 megawatts of generating capacity – nearly half of the county’s energy requirements.

  • Intersection earns its stripes

    Workers stripe the road at the corner of Rover and Meadow in White Rock.

  • Tornado-stricken Joplin goes back to school--video extra

    JOPLIN, MO. (AP) — The trophy case by the front entrance is nearly empty. Classroom walls are largely bare, and unopened boxes of textbooks, computer monitors and other equipment remain scattered throughout the building.

    Signs of unfinished business remain at what is now Joplin High's upper-level campus — a converted big-box retail store at the city's mall, well outside the worst-hit areas from a late May tornado that killed 160 people, injured hundreds more and destroyed thousands of buildings, including the city's only public high school.

  • Vigils charged with child abuse

    Nearly a year after the death of a Los Alamos newborn, the District Attorney’s Office is charging the infant’s mother and grandparents with child abuse.

    The DA announced Tuesday afternoon that “Baby Grey Vigil,” who lived just 11 days after being born at his grandparents Los Alamos home last September, was the victim of child abuse regardless of the fact that his autopsy showed he had a rare medical condition that ultimately caused his death, according to prosecutors.

    In documents filed in the First Judicial District Court by Deputy District Attorney Judith Reed, the infant’s mother Katrina Vigil has been charged with one count of child abuse – negligently causing or permitting (no death or great bodily harm).

  • Child abuse charges filed in Baby Grey case

    The case of 11-day old Grey Vigil is not over.

    The Los Alamos County District Attorney filed charges against the mother and grandparents of “Baby Grey” Tuesday afternoon. In a letter filed in the First Judicial District Court by deputy district attorney Judith Reed, Katrina Vigil, the mother, was charged with one count of child abuse – negligently cause or permit (No death or great bodily harm).

    Grandparents Holly J. Vigil and Robert Vigil also were charged with the same count. The charge is considered a third-degree felony.

  • Can social media impact epidemics?

    Connecting social media and epidemiological research, a new study by Los Alamos National Laboratory and Tulane University will attempt to predict the future, i.e. people’s social behavior during an epidemic, using Twitter, the social media messaging site. If successful, the results will improve the computer models used to plan and respond to disease outbreaks. Understanding human behavior can help save people’s lives and the government millions of dollars in vaccine costs and epidemic response planning.

  • Correction 08-16-11

    The article, “Event supports Alzheimer’s research,” which appeared in the Sunday, Aug. 14 edition of the Los Alamos Monitor, listed Vickie Griffis’ title at Aspen Ridge as, “director of families for five years.” It should have said Griffis has been a volunteer facilitating the Alzheimer’s support groups in Los Alamos for five years. Her title at Aspen Ridge is activities director, which she held for two years.

  • Superblitz to kick off Friday

    SANTA FE— New Mexico Department of Transportation Secretary Alvin C. Dominguez, New Mexico State Police Chief Robert Shilling and Santa Fe Mayor David Coss were joined today by representatives from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), and other state and local officials to kick off the state’s latest Superblitz to coincide with the national crackdown on impaired driving, themed “Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over.”
    The Superblitz will run from Aug. 19 through Labor Day, Sept. 5 and will correspond with the nationwide enforcement effort to crackdown on impaired driving and reduce roadway fatalities. The campaign will target young male drivers and motorcycle riders, who are reportedly the most common perpetrators.