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Local News

  • Forging ties half way around the world

    Miles of ocean may separate Tinian and Los Alamos, but the local county and the island in the Philippine Sea share more in common than some may think. Both played a pivotal role in World War II.

    For Los Alamos, that role was the Manhattan Project. For Tinian, which is part of the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, there were the airfield strips used by the airplanes that carried the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

    Read the whole story in today's Monitor.

  • Headed to the border

    Patrolling a wide area plagued by violence in recent months isn’t exactly how most people envision spending the remaining days of summer.

    The New Mexico-Mexico border has become a hot spot for drug smugglers and people crossing the border illegally. As a result, Gov. Bill Richardson ordered National Guard troops to the 2,000-mile southern border.

    Two local men will be there.

  • Golf course clubhouse rolls forward

    The Los Alamos Golf Course clubhouse looked wilted in the afternoon sun. Its stucco exterior bubbled and peeled at the corners and the main entrance was shrouded in darkness.

    The clubhouse, which was built in the 1970s, has served not just golfers but the community. Everything from tournaments to Easter egg hunts are held on its grounds. It seems only fair that Los Alamos return the favor, and on July 12, the county did.

  • Golf course clubhouse rolls forward

    The Los Alamos Golf Course clubhouse looked wilted in the afternoon sun. Its stucco exterior bubbled and peeled at the corners and the main entrance was shrouded in darkness.

    The clubhouse, which was built in the 1970s, has served not just golfers but the community. Everything from tournaments to Easter egg hunts are held on its grounds. It seems only fair that Los Alamos return the favor, and on July 12, the county did.

     

    Read the full story in today's Monitor.

  • Don't miss this week's Police Beat

    Read about the week in review at the Los Alamos Police Department... Click here.

  • Primary roundup: Michigan incumbent goes down, Missouri voters approve anti-Obamacare measure

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Incumbents beware. Another lawmaker just bit the dust.

    Michigan Rep. Carolyn Cheeks Kilpatrick lost her bid for an eighth term on Tuesday, her son's legal woes dragging her down in a year when fickle voters seem eager to fire longtime lawmakers.

  • Retail data: Americans remained cautious in July

    NEW YORK (AP) — Worried about the stalling economic recovery, Americans remained reluctant to spend at stores in July, especially on pricier items like jewelry, though they let go of some money for travel, according to data released Wednesday.

  • Black members of tea party dispute racist claims

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Black members of the tea party movement on Wednesday rejected charges of racism by the group's activists, saying they oppose President Barack Obama because of his policies not his skin color.

    The members gathered at a Washington news conference in the wake of allegations about its rank and file, heightened by the recent split with a Tea Party Express leader who had posted a letter on his blog written from "Colored People" to Abraham Lincoln. The post suggested that black people would choose slavery over having to do real work.

  • Muni building sparks debate

    Although it hasn’t been built yet, the municipal building is already sparking a wide range of emotions from Los Alamos County – in its councilors and its citizens.

    There is frustration, trust issues and confusion.

    But there is also faith that the building is being ushered into reality.

    Read more in today's Monitor

  • Savvy bicyclists bode better

    Riding a bicycle one-handed into a pothole while chatting on a cell phone is dumb – yet people do it every day.

    As roadways and bike trails become increasingly complex and congested, riders need to be equipped with safety knowledge and the know-how to teach their children how to ride confidently and conspicuously when on their own. Trained bicyclists have a much better chance of avoiding injury and even death than do their less trained counterparts, according to the experts.