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Local News

  • Economic chief vacates post after 7 months

    Los Alamos County’s top economic development leader, Scott Frederick, is no longer employed with the county. The county and Frederick reportedly came to a parting of the ways last Friday afternoon, but details are not being released by officials because it is a personnel matter.

  • Trouble brews beneath the surface of Ashley Pond

    Every town has a center, a location that is the hub of activity and a source of community pride. Ashley Pond could certainly be considered Los Alamos’ center; however, beneath the placid surface of the water trouble is brewing.

  • Muni building battle intensifies

    An estimated $3.1 million has been spent to date on the Los Alamos County Municipal Building and no earth has been turned.

    County Chief Financial Officer Steve Lynne said that cost includes $1.1 million for building designs, $900,000 to demolish the old building and $300,000 to demolish the LA Apartments to make room for the new 60,000 square foot building.

    In addition, another $800,000 has been spent for temporary county office space at various locations in the last three years.

  • Pilots among those dismayed at scanners, pat-downs

    CHICAGO (AP) — Airport security stops one airline pilot because he's carrying a butter knife. Elsewhere, crews opt for pat-down searches because they fear low-level radiation from body scanners could be harmful. And in San Diego, one traveler is told he can't fly at all when he likens an intrusive body search to sexual harassment.

  • House ethics panel: Rep. Rangel violated rules

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Rep. Charles Rangel, once one of the most influential House members, was convicted Tuesday on 11 counts of breaking ethics rules and now faces punishment.

    An ethics panel of eight House peers deliberated over two days before delivering a jarring blow to the 20-term New York Democrat's career. The 80-year-old Rangel was charged with 13 counts of financial and fundraising misconduct.

  • Murkowski leads in Alaska Senate race

    JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) — Election workers are scheduled to continue counting ballots in Alaska's still-undecided Senate race.

    About 8,800 ballots were to be tallied on Tuesday, a day after election officials said Sen. Lisa Murkowski had emerged from several days of counting with a 1,706 vote lead over GOP nominee Joe Miller.

  • Wholesale prices rise on higher gas costs

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Wholesale prices rose in October for the fourth straight month due to higher gas costs, but there was little sign of inflation as the cost of food, cars and computers all fell.

    The Labor Department said Tuesday that the Producer Price Index rose 0.4 percent last month, the same increase as September and August. Wall Street analysts had expected a larger increase. The index is up by 4.3 percent in the past 12 months.

  • Hope fades in search of collapsed Indian building

    NEW DELHI (AP) — Anna Halder sat on a patch of packed mud and dialed her cell phone Tuesday, clinging to the hope that her parents or sisters somehow survived under the wreckage of their collapsed apartment building and would pick up.

    "It's ringing," she said. No one answered. She dialed again.

  • Expect high winds for much of Tuesday

    The Los Alamos area got its first taste of winter Monday evening as a light snowfall dusted the area. Residents awoke to patchy fog Tuesday morning that is expected to diminish and give way to windy conditions throughout most of the day.

    The National Weather Service has issued a wind advisory from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday for east-central New Mexico including the Interstate 40 corridor from Clines Corners to Tucumcari.

  • Martinez reacts to budget gap

    During a laboratory tour Friday, Governor-elect Susana Martinez was still reeling from Thursday’s new estimate that the state’s fiscal-year budget deficit is closer to $450 million rather than the $260 million originally reported.
    Martinez minced few words about having to deal with a nearly 75 percent higher deficit than she was led to believe. She accused Gov. Bill Richardson’s administration of not being honest with New Mexicans about the budget crisis.