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Local News

  • Lab security chief pulls no punches

    Changing apartments every third month, traveling alternate routes each day and maintaining constant awareness of his surroundings in foreign countries was the way of life in the adrenaline-driven occupations John E. (Jack) Killeen has enjoyed in his career.  

    Killeen is the division leader of the Security Services Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory where he oversees its protective force, physical security and classified matter protection.

    On Friday, he gave a powerful Veterans’ Day speech to a crowd gathered at the Veterans of Foreign Wars Building on Trinity Drive.

  • WR committee moves forward

    Kent Budge addressed the White Rock Master Plan Implementation Committee (WRMPIC) as a private citizen Monday evening. Budge resigned the committee last week, after serving as chair since the committee formed in 2008.

    Budge focused on how the committee should move forward.

    “My concern is that when we originally got together, we had almost complete support from council. They always listened to us,” Budge said. “They didn’t always agree with us – I’d be worried if they did. But this was a whole new development.”

  • NM rattlesnakes used for cancer research trials

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Four Western diamondback rattlesnakes from Albuquerque's zoo are helping with the first clinical trials of venom as a cancer treatment in humans.

    Officials say the snakes have been sent to the Kentucky Reptile Zoo, one of four premier venom laboratories in the United States. The snakes' venom will be extracted and sent to France, where the clinical studies are under way.

    Snake venom contains hundreds of proteins that affect the human body in various ways.

    The proteins can be devastating when combined. In isolation, these proteins can be used to treat health issues from strokes and heart attacks to Alzheimer's disease and cancer.

  • AP Exclusive: NM governor clarifies immigrant past

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez has dug into her family's ancestry and uncovered immigration documents that she says suggest her paternal grandparents followed common practices in coming to the United States from Mexico in the early 1900s, contradicting earlier indications they were illegal immigrants.

    Martinez, a Republican and the nation's only female Hispanic governor, made headlines this year by acknowledging that her grandparents came to the U.S. without immigration documents. But she said her comments were based on what she has since learned were mischaracterizations of census information by the news media.

  • Cops: 2-year-old's throat slashed by NM dad

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — A 2-year-old is in critical condition after police say her Albuquerque father slashed her throat.

    Police said 26-year-old Chee Livingston stabbed the young girl and the girl's mother, Blanche Johnson, who tried to stop him early Monday.

    Police said an 8-year-old girl in the apartment called police.

    The toddler and her mother were taken to University of New Mexico Hospital. Police said both were expected to survive.

    Livingston was treated for what appeared to be self-inflicted injuries then booked into jail on child abuse and attempted murder charges.

  • Update 11-13-11

    County Council

     The Los Alamos County Council will meet at 7 p.m. Nov. 15  in the White Rock Fire House No. 3.

    WR Committee

    The public is encouraged to attend the White Rock Master Plan Implementation Committee at 6 p.m. Monday at the White Rock Town Hall.

    Of Note

    Looking for Teen Pulse?
    The Teen Pulse page is on hiatus for a week due to vacation schedules. Look for Teen Pulse to return next Sunday in the Los Alamos Monitor.

    Kiwanis Meeting

    Kiwanis meets noon to 1 p.m., Tuesdays at the Masonic Temple on Sage. On Nov. 15, Kiwanian Morrie Pongratz, who goes home to help his family with the harvest each year, will speak on farming in the Midwest.

  • Spread holiday cheer at home, worldwide

    Charles Dickens – one of the first great promoters of Christmas generosity – wrote in “A Christmas Carol “…it is a time, of all others, when Want is keenly felt, and Abundance rejoices.” Dickens penned that in 1843, but it still holds true today.

    There are many opportunities to give to those in need this time of year. Two local groups – both part of nationwide efforts – offer creative ways to help our seniors and children around the world.
    Be a Santa to a senior

  • Opponents have concerns about NASA launch

    NASA intends in coming weeks to launch a rover to be deployed on Mars fueled with 10.6 pounds of plutonium.

    That has prompted opponents of the launch in Florida, concerned about an accident releasing deadly plutonium--such as an explosion of the rocket that’s to lift the rover into space—to create a Facebook page warning people not to visit Disney theme parks in Orlando during the November 25-to-December 15 launch window. “Don’t Do Disney brought to you by NASA,” is the title of the Facebook page. Other actions are planned.

  • With groundbreaking, Smart Grid project underway

    U.S. Congressman Ben Ray Lujan and the Director General Hidekazu Takakura with Japan’s New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO) broke ground Wednesday for the construction of a two megawatt solar array on the Los Alamos capped landfill.  This is the first phase of the larger New Mexico/Japan Smart Grid Collaborative Demonstration Project in Los Alamos.

    NEDO is teaming with Los Alamos County’s Department of Public Utilities and the Los Alamos National Laboratory for the Los Alamos project, and with the Public Service Company of New Mexico (PNM), Mesa Del Sol, and Sandia National Laboratories for a project in Albuquerque.  Both projects will demonstrate the viability of smart grid technology in New Mexico.

  • Los Alamos salutes veterans