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Local News

  • Governor signs four bills into law

    LAS CRUCES — Gov. Bill Richardson has signed four bills into law from the recently concluded New Mexico regular legislative session, including a bill that protects state employees who speak out about unlawful activity and government corruption.

    Richardson signed the Spaceport Informed Consent Act, the Colonias Infrastructure Act and Fund and the Las Cruces Tax Increment Project Bond bill during an appearance Saturday in Las Cruces.

    The governor also signed the Whistleblower Protection Act, sponsored by Rep. Joseph Cervantes,

  • Local woman found safe in Chile

    The earthquake that devastated Chile Saturday morning also jolted Los Alamos.

    With growing apprehension Chuck Pergler and Mary Skarra reported that their daughter Isis Skarra-Pergler was still missing Monday.

    She was traveling with her boyfriend Joe Stoffers when the 8.8-magnitude quake occurred. The couple was believed to be camping on a beach at that time, most likely in an impacted area.

  • Lawmakers whittle down budget gap

    SANTA FE — A little bit of everything was thrown into the legislative hopper to get a balanced budget passed this week, as lawmakers began a special session Monday.

    The new mixture, approved by Democratic Party leaders last week, includes tax increases and spending cuts in a package of nine bills identified in Governor Richardson’s proclamation. The announcement that defined the agenda was issued shortly before the Senate opened for business at about 2 p.m., followed within the hour by the House.

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  • Lawman targets sheriff post

    Longtime Los Alamos resident Marco Lucero has spent more than 22 years of his life fighting crime and working his way up the ranks of the Santa Fe County Sheriff’s Department.

    Lucero, 46, is running for Los Alamos County sheriff and if elected, would become the first state certified law enforcement officer to serve as sheriff in Los Alamos County.

  • January spending increases but income growth slows

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Personal spending jumped by a larger amount than expected in January but Americans' incomes barely budged. The weak income growth could depress spending in the months ahead, acting as a further drag on the fragile economic recovery.

    The Commerce Department said that personal spending rose by 0.5 percent in January, slightly better than expected. But incomes edged up only 0.1 percent, significantly lower than the 0.4 percent gain that economists had expected.

  • NM lawmakers mull tax hikes as special session kicks off

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico will pay higher taxes when they buy goods and services, including food, under a budget-balancing package proposed by Democratic legislative leaders.

    The House and Senate will consider the budget package, including more than $200 million in tax increases, during a special session that convenes Monday.

  • Publisher pulls plug on Hiroshima bomb book

    NEW YORK (AP) — Publication has been halted for a disputed book about the atomic bombing of Japan in 1945, The Associated Press has learned.

    Charles Pellegrino's "The Last Train from Hiroshima" had received strong reviews and had been optioned for a possible film by "Avatar" director James Cameron. But publisher Henry Holt and Company, responding to questions from the AP, said Monday that Pellegrino "was not able to answer" several concerns, including whether two men mentioned in the text actually existed.

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  • Massive 8.8 earthquake rocks Chile, tsunami warnings issued for Pacific region

    SANTIAGO, Chile (AP) — A devastating magnitude-8.8 earthquake struck Chile early Saturday, shattering buildings and bridges, killing at least 78 people and setting off a tsunami that threatened every nation around the Pacific Ocean — roughly a quarter of the globe.

    Chilean TV showed devastating images of the most powerful quake to hit the country in a half-century: In the second city of Concepcion trucks plunged into the fractured earth, homes fell, bridges collapsed and buildings were engulfed in flames. Injured people lay in the streets or on stretchers.