Local News

  • Trujillo named interim executive director at Valles Caldera

    Valles Caldera National Preserve Manager Dennis Trujillo has been named interim executive director of the organization that oversees the 89,000-acre federally owned preserve in northern New Mexico.
    The board of trustees of the Valles Caldera Trust announced Trujillo’s appointment. He has been preserve manager since 2002and he directly supervises the management of natural resources, recreation, roads, facilities, fleet, fire, law enforcement, safety, merchandizing, and special uses.
    Trujillo has overseen the development of the proposed plans for landscape restoration and management and public access and use, including leading comprehensive planning for the Preserve.

  • Proposal would expand local Historic District

    The first topic under discussion at the Fuller Lodge Historic District Advisory Board meeting Wednesday evening was a proposed expansion of the National Historic Landmark District (NHLD).

    The expansion would include 18 Manhattan Project-era buildings “behind the fence” at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

    Ellen McGehee, who manages LANL’s Historic Buildings Program, and Judy Machen, who is assisting her on the project, presented the report.

  • On board for space flight

    Gazing at the Earth from space is a lifelong dream on the verge of coming true for Los Alamos astrophysicist Stephen Becker.

    “It will be the highlight of my life,” said 60-year-old Becker, who holds a ticket on a commercial spaceflight with Virgin Galactic, expected to launch next year.

    “The flight will last about two-and-a-half hours,” he said. “We’ll travel 100 kilometers, 61 miles, to the edge of space and the weightlessness at the top of the flight will last about five minutes.”

    Becker is a private pilot. He explained that the X-15 rocket planes manufactured in the 1960s flew to 61 miles, whereas commercial airlines typically reach just six or seven miles.

  • Locals vie for House seat

    Sandoval County Commissioners nominated Los Alamos Democrat Stephanie Richard on Thursday to fill the House District 43 seat left vacant following the death of Jeannette Wallace from illness in April.
    Republican Gov. Susana Martinez is interviewing each of the nominees from the three counties that comprise District 43.

    Martinez interviewed Richard in her fourth floor office at the Round House at 7 p.m. Wednesday.

  • Romney: 'Barack Obama has failed America'--video extra

    MANCHESTER, N.H. (AP) — Mitt Romney is opening his first formal day as a 2012 Republican presidential candidate by pitching himself as the one to heal the economy and issuing a direct challenge to the man he wants to replace: "Barack Obama has failed America," he says.

    In excerpts released ahead of his formal kick-off speech Thursday, Romney homes in on the economic woes that are frustrating voters: a lack of jobs, persistent foreclosures and runaway spending in Washington.

  • Mass. towns digging out after tornadoes kill 4--video extras

    SPRINGFIELD, Mass. (AP) — The Rev. Bob Marrone was pained to see the steeple of his 137-year-old church shattered and strewn on the grass in the central Massachusetts town of Monson, yet he knows he's more fortunate than some of his neighbors who lost their homes after tornadoes tore through the state, killing at least four people, damaging buildings, uprooting trees and shattering lives.

    "I can see the plywood of roofs, and see houses where most of the house is gone," said Marrone, pastor of The First Church of Monson. "The road that runs up in front of my house ... There's so many trees down, it's completely impassable."

  • High bar set for proposed recalls

    The Initiative and Referendum subcommittee also has been charged with rewriting the Recall section of the charter.

  • Hearings to begin on pollution controls

    ALBUQUERQUE — The state was scheduled for hearings Wednesday on a plan to reduce the rate hikes New Mexico electric customers will face for federally mandated pollution controls at a coal-fired plant near Farmington.
    The state Environmental Improvement Board has proposed a $77 million plan for improvements to meet new Environmental Protection Agency directives, which it estimates will cost the Public Service Company of New Mexico customers about $11 a year, according to the Albuquerque Journal.
    That compares to an EPA plan that officials estimate would cost ratepayers about $85 a year.

  • WHO: Cell phones may cause cancer

    In a report issued today, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), which is an arm of the World Health Organization (WHO), said it now lists mobile phone use in the same category as lead, gasoline engine exhaust and chloroform. Officially, cell phone radiation is listed as a “carcinogenic hazard.”
    Until today, the WHO’s IARC had said that there were no adverse health effects from the use of cell phones. The wireless industry, including the CTIA lobbying group, and the Federal Communications Commission and U.S. Food and Drug Administration have also long maintained that cell phones are safe.

  • Los Alamos Monitor prize winner

    George Mattys of Los Alamos (center) is presented with a $100 gift card by Los Alamos Monitor publisher Keven Tood (right) and circulation administrator Mike Lippiatt. Mattys won the April drawing as part of the Los Alamos Monitor’s Customer Appreciation promotion.