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Local News

  • Council goes for high-speed Google

    At a meeting in White Rock Tuesday, county council will consider applying to participate in the Google Fiber Initiative, an experimental “open access” network that will offer fiber-to-home connections. The Google service proposes to operate at gigabit per second speeds, 100 times faster than current home service. County staff believes Los Alamos is especially suited for the test, because of its high educational levels, affluence and advanced scientific and technological interests, among other factors.

  • Residents prefer park service

    Fences may make good neighbors, to paraphrase poet Robert Frost, but in the case of Los Alamos and one of its largest neighbors, the problem isn’t the fences. It’s how to get through the gates more easily.

    That was one main conclusion after a council session and a couple of public meetings over the last few weeks on the subject of managing the Valles Caldera National Preserve.

  • Retail sales post promising gain in February

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Retail sales posted a surprising increase in February as consumers did not let major snowstorms stop them from storming the malls. The advance, the biggest since November, provided hope that the recovery from the Great Recession is gaining momentum.

    The Commerce Department said Friday that retail sales rose 0.3 percent in February, surpassing expectations that sales would decline by 0.2 percent.

  • Super Blitz kicks off today

    SANTA FE — New Mexico’s “Spring Super Blitz” begins today and continues daily through March 28. 

    This year’s “Spring Super Blitz” includes increased DWI enforcement and features a new ad campaign, which highlights the difficult decisions about the consequences faced by family members when a loved one has been arrested for DWI.

  • Shabby isn’t chic

    Not many people are drawn to shop or dine in a run down establishment. And those who are may not be the clientele business owners hope to cater to.

    Local business owners attended a workshop Thursday morning at UNM-LA that stressed the importance of well-maintained storefronts.

    Next to location, curb appeal is cited as the number two factor for generating first time sales at businesses and restaurants, according to New Mexico MainStreet, the organization that headlined the workshop.

  • Charter reform gets specific

    A closer look at current procedures for approving capital improvement projects and a quest to unlock the secrets of good communications motivated two groups of citizens to look under the surface of county government.

    The county council project to review the governing charter moved into a new phase Thursday as two subcommittees charged with analyzing the issues met in back-to-back meetings in the Community Building.

    One committee examined the question of “the perceived need for voters to have more control over major county projects.”

  • First-time jobless claims decline slightly last week

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of newly laid-off workers requesting unemployment benefits slipped last week, the latest sign the employment picture is slowly brightening.

    The Labor Department said initial jobless claims fell by 6,000 to a seasonally adjusted 462,000. That's close to Wall Street analysts' estimates of 460,000, according to Thomson Reuters, and the second straight drop.

    Still, the four-week average of claims, which smooths volatility, rose to 475,500, reflecting a sharp increase in claims last month.

  • NEWS ALERT Phelps chairs cleanup endgame for CAB

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  • New law limits insurance administrative costs

    SANTA FE — New state laws will stop discrimination against women in the pricing of medical insurance and limit how much health insurance companies spend on administrative costs.

    Gov. Bill Richardson signed the measures into law on Tuesday, saying they will improve the state’s health care system.

    “Currently, insurers in New Mexican can charge women up to 20 percent more than men for individual and small group health insurance plans. This is unacceptable,” Richardson said.

  • Law OKs guns in eateries

    SANTA FE — People licensed for concealed handguns can take their weapons into New Mexico restaurants serving beer and wine under a new state law.

    Gov. Bill Richardson signed legislation into law on Wednesday. It takes effect in July.

    However, restaurants can stop people from bringing their handguns into an eatery by posting a sign that prohibits firearms or if the restaurant’s owner or manager tells a patron that firearms aren’t allowed.