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Local News

  • NM hires broker to sell state jet bought for $5.5M

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Republican Gov. Susana Martinez vowed to get rid of the state's executive jet plane, and now she will have help from a Colorado-based aviation broker with international reach.

    The state General Services Department announced Tuesday that it awarded a contract to Wetzel Aviation Inc. to sell the Cessna Citation Bravo.

    Selling the seven-seat plane has been a priority of Martinez since she took office in January.

  • US holds photos of slain bin Laden, weighs release

    WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. officials weighed the pros and cons of releasing secret video and photos of Osama bin Laden, killed with a precision shot above his left eye, as fresh details emerged Tuesday of an audacious American raid that netted potentially crucial al-Qaida records as well as the body of the global terrorist leader.

    President Barack Obama is going to ground zero in New York to mark the milestone and remember the dead of 9/11.

  • FEMA seeks to redeem agency reputation

    BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) — The messages came in a fast and furious onslaught: a series of massively powerful tornadoes were ripping across Alabama and other parts of the South.

    On the receiving end of frantic descriptions of entire neighborhoods wiped out by last week's pulverizing storms that killed 342, Federal Emergency Management Agency administrator Craig Fugate urged President Barack Obama to immediately sign an emergency disaster declaration for Alabama.

    The near immediate response was starkly different from past catastrophes.

  • Pakistan's president denies harboring bin Laden

    ABBOTTABAD, Pakistan (AP) — Pakistan's leader denied suggestions that his country's security forces sheltered Osama bin Laden as Britain demanded Tuesday that Islamabad answer for how the al-Qaida chief lived undetected for six years in a large house in a garrison town close to the capital.

    But in a nod to the complexities of dealing with a nuclear-armed, unstable country that is crucial to success in the war in neighboring Afghanistan, British Prime Minister David Cameron said having "a massive row" with Islamabad over the issue would not be in Britain's interest.

  • One unwary phone call led US to bin Laden doorstep--video extra

    WASHINGTON (AP) — When one of Osama bin Laden's most trusted aides picked up the phone last year, he unknowingly led U.S. pursuers to the doorstep of his boss, the world's most wanted terrorist.

    That phone call, recounted Monday by a U.S. official, ended a years-long search for bin Laden's personal courier, the key break in a worldwide manhunt. The courier, in turn, led U.S. intelligence to a walled compound in northeast Pakistan, where a team of Navy SEALs shot bin Laden to death.

  • Bin Laden's luxury hideout raises questions--video extras

    ABBOTTABAD, Pakistan (AP) — Osama bin Laden made his final stand in a small Pakistani city where three army regiments with thousands of soldiers are based not far from the capital — a location that is increasing suspicions in Washington that Islamabad may have been sheltering him.

    The U.S. acted alone in Monday's helicopter raid, did not inform Pakistan until it was over and pointedly did not thank Pakistan at the end of a wildly successful operation. All this suggests more strain ahead in a relationship that was already suffering because of U.S. accusations that the Pakistanis are supporting Afghan militants and Pakistani anger over American drone attacks and spy activity.

  • AP source: US used 'multiple methods" to ID body

    WASHINGTON (AP) — After the firefight that killed Osama bin Laden, the U.S. used "multiple methods" to positively identify his remains, according to a senior Pentagon official who personally saw a photograph of the corpse.

    The official, who discussed the matter on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak publicly, declined to specify the methods of identification, but two Obama administration officials said DNA evidence confirmed the death.

    The officials claimed the DNA evidence provides a match with 99.9 percent confidence.

  • Inside the raid that killed bin Laden--video extra

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Helicopters descended out of darkness on the most important counterterrorism mission in U.S. history. It was an operation so secret, only a select few U.S. officials knew what was about to happen.

    The location was a fortified compound in an affluent Pakistani town two hours outside Islamabad. The target was Osama bin Laden.

    Intelligence officials discovered the compound in August while monitoring an al-Qaida courier. The CIA had been hunting that courier for years, ever since detainees told interrogators that the courier was so trusted by bin Laden that he might very well be living with the al-Qaida leader.

  • US kills Osama bin Laden decade after 9/11 attacks--video extra

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Osama bin Laden, the face of global terrorism and architect of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, was killed in a firefight with elite American forces Monday, then quickly buried at sea in a stunning finale to a furtive decade on the run.

    Long believed to be hiding in caves, bin Laden was tracked down in a costly, custom-built hideout not far from a Pakistani military academy.

    "Justice has been done," President Barack Obama said in a dramatic announcement at the White House while a crowd cheered outside and hundreds more gathered at ground zero in Manhattan to celebrate the news.

    The military operation took mere minutes.

  • NAVY SEALS DELIVER JUSTICE FOR BIN LADEN--video extras

    ABBOTTABAD, Pakistan (AP) — The death of Osama bin Laden in a fortress-like compound on the outskirts of a Pakistani city that is home to three army regiments and thousands of soldiers raises questions over whether Pakistani security forces knew the whereabouts of the world's most wanted man.

    The al-Qaida chief was living in a house in Abbottabad that a U.S. administration official said was "custom built to hide someone of significance." The city around 60 miles from the capital Islamabad is a far cry from the remote mountain caves along the Pakistan-Afghanistan tribal border where most intelligence assessments had put bin Laden in recent years.