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Local News

  • Officials: NADG, county close on Trinity Site deal

    New details surfaced regarding negotiations on the Trinity Site Revitalization Project during Tuesday’s county council meeting.

    Acting Assistant County Administrator Steve Lynne and Acting County Administrator Randy Autio told council that an appraisal of the property has been completed.

    The council selected North American Development Group (NADG) in November to develop the site, which is located at Trinity Drive and Knecht Street.

    Lynne said that the county met three weeks ago with NADG and Smith’s Food and Drug Center, which is proposing a Smith’s Marketplace as the site’s anchor store.

    The meeting allowed the county to ensure that all parties are on the same page, he said.

  • Hunt antlers at Valles

    Wanted: Youth groups willing to spend the day outdoors learning about elk and hunting for antler sheds.  
     The Valles Caldera National Preserve is offering this free, educational opportunity is for non-profit youth groups.  
    The   program includes education on elk habitat and behavior. It also offers  youth groups a chance to explore the preserve on foot while hunting for  antlers. The antlers gathered will be used to support this program and  the management of the preserve.  

  • Udall to attend DPU's ceremony

    Thursday, U.S. Sen. Tom Udall will take part in the grand opening of the Los Alamos Department of Public Utilities’ new low-flow hydroelectric turbine at the Abiquiu hydroelectric facility.
    The ceremony will begin at 10:30 a.m.  Following the ceremony, there will be tours of the facility from 11 a.m.-noon. Participating in the ceremony is just one stop on Udall’s tour through  eight New Mexico counties.  The newly-installed turbine, funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), was created on site in Abiquiu and created 20 full-time jobs.

  • New DOT rule tackles fees, bumping, flight delays

    DALLAS (AP) — Airlines will soon be required to refund bag fees if they lose luggage, and they'll pay travelers more for bumping them from a flight.

    The federal government planned to announce new passenger protections Wednesday that also expand a tarmac-delay rule to prevent passengers from being stranded on international flights for longer than four hours.

    The airlines will also have to include fees and taxes in advertised prices.

  • College students get hard lessons in finance

    WASHINGTON (AP) — In these tight times, college students are getting a lesson in economics no matter what their major. Students say money influences everything from what school they attend and what career they pursue to how quickly they complete their degrees — or whether they graduate at all.

    Money problems, not bad grades, are the reason cited by most college students who have considered dropping out, an Associated Press-Viacom poll finds.

  • Careful search for mementos slows Japan's rebuilding

    KESENNUMA, Japan (AP) — Sakuji Funayama watched intently as a giant steel claw tore chunks off the remains of his two-story home, ripped open like a dollhouse by last month's tsunami and washed up onto a pile of debris. Suddenly, he spied something, waved his arms and pointed.

    The claw froze and a half dozen construction workers scrambled into the wreckage, emerging a few minutes later with a battered backpack that belonged to Funayama's son, who moved away years ago. He set it off to the side.

  • Day of remembrance: 1 year after Gulf oil disaster

    NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Relatives of some of the 11 men who died aboard the Deepwater Horizon oil rig are flying over the Gulf of Mexico on Wednesday, back to the epicenter of the worst offshore oil spill in the nation's history.

    Meanwhile, on land, vigils were scheduled in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida to mark the spill.

  • Storm's human, financial toll rises in Raleigh, NC

    RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — The tornado that carved through North Carolina's capital killed four children, shuttered a university for the rest of the spring semester and felled the signature trees in the metropolis known as the "City of Oaks."

    It was the most active system of tornadoes on record in the state's history, leading to 23 deaths. In Raleigh, one of the nation's fastest-growing cities, the death toll and property damages underscored the massive costs that can be inflicted when a tornado makes a rare venture into areas of dense population.

    In all, the storm killed 45 people in six states, but North Carolina was by far the hardest-hit.

  • D. Ray Smith to speak about Oak Ridge

    D. Ray Smith, historian at the Y-12 plant in Oak Ridge, Tenn., shares stories from the earliest white settlement in the land of the Cherokee to the removal of 3,000 farmers to make way for the most significant military and industrial achievement in history, to modern day applications of the technological advances of the nuclear era.  As he spins legends and tales, Smith shares historic photographs from Manhattan Project photographer Ed Westcott, as well as humorous interludes to look at the lighter side of history.

  • Update 04-19-11

    DPU meeting
    The Department of Public Utilities (DPU) board will meet at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday at the DPU conference room. 

    Dem Party meeting
    The Democratic Party of Los Alamos County will host its monthly meeting from 7-30 p.m. Thursday at the Mesa Public Library meeting room 3.

    GOP meeting
    The Republican Party of Los Alamos County will meet Thursday at 7:30 p.m. at the Best Western Hilltop Hotel.

    ESB meeting
    The Environmental Sustainability Board will host a meeting at 7 a.m. Thursday at the Eco Station Administration Building.