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Local News

  • Another day dawns in LA

    A new day begins in Los Alamos this morning with a brilliant sunrise to the east.

  • Clerk debate continues

    At Tuesday’s work session, the Los Alamos County Council waived its usual rules regarding public comment to encourage a lively debate about the county clerk’s duties and compensation and whether the charter should be changed to make the clerk an appointed rather than an elected position.

    The conversation was sparked by the Charter Review Committee’s (CRC) recommendations.

    Council Chair Sharon Stover, who is running for county clerk in the coming election, recused herself. County Clerk Janet Foster and former County Clerk Mary Pat Kraemer provided feedback.

    In the current charter, the clerk is an elected, part-time position. At present, compensation is set at $6,000 per year.
    The CRC’s report reads:

    “Council has historically set the salary for the position of the clerk at a token level. Consequently, clerks since the establishment of the office have viewed the position of clerk as either token or part-time.

  • 2 Sheriff's Deputies Dead 2 Hurt in La. Shootout
  • Thousands Crowd Graceland for Elvis Vigil
  • Today in History for August 16th
  • 'Women for Heather' has LA county chair

    Heather Wilson, Republican candidate for the U.S. Senate, announced today that Los Alamos resident Francine J. Mendoza will lead Women for Heather in Los Alamos County.
    She joins the statewide grassroots team and will lead the county’s efforts to elect the first female senator from New Mexico.
    “This year we have a special opportunity to elect Heather Wilson as New Mexico’s first woman U.S. Senator,” Mendoza said.
    “Heather is the only pro-life candidate running for the U.S. Senate, and I know she will reflect my values when she is elected.
    She will also fight to create jobs here in New Mexico. And that is why I’m supporting Heather Wilson to be our next U.S. senator.”
    “I’m happy that Francine has joined our campaign to elect the first woman senator from New Mexico,” Wilson said.
    “The extreme policies coming out of Washington have made things harder and more expensive for New Mexico women. Too many of us are getting by, but not getting on. It’s time to change direction.”
    Mendoza has a degree in secondary education and social studies. She served as a teacher in Tallahassee, Fla., while raising her three children.

  • Update 08-15-12

    No CIP Thursday

    The CIP Evaluation and Oversight Committee will not meet Thursday. They plan to meet with County Administrator Harry Burgess in a special committee meeting at 5:15 p.m. Aug. 23 in Council Chambers. This will be the only agenda item for the meeting. The public is welcome to attend.

    Triathlon time

    The Los Alamos County Triathlon will take place at 7 a.m. Saturday, beginning at the Aquatic Center.

    Groundbreaking

    The public is invited to join the county council for the groundbreaking event for the new Golf Course Community Building at 11:30 a.m. Aug. 24, at the building site. Refreshments will be served.

    Regional coalition

    The Regional Coalition Business meeting will be at 9 a.m. Friday at the Rio Arriba County Courthouse.

    Board meeting

    The Environmental Sustainability Board will meet at 5:30 p.m. Thursday in the Community Building Training Room.

  • Sign code change inches closer

    Attempts to update and simplify the county’s sign code began in 2005. After years of contention and delays, Community and Economic Development Department (CEDD) Principal Planner Gary Leikness is optimistic about the possibility of having a new code by the end of the year.

    Leikness presented his draft revision to a group of business and retail owners Monday night and to the Los Alamos County Council at Tuesday’s work session. The county attorney’s office is also reviewing the draft. Although specific elements of the code were debated, reaction overall was positive.

    Two core changes to the code garnered support.

    “The heart of it is a matrix that explains what’s allowed and what’s not. In the current code it’s broken out into three or four different tables, and it gets confusing,” Leikness said.  “What we’re shooting for there is to dramatically simplify the permitting process. I think this draft will help staff understand the code better when they apply it and, hopefully, it will be easier for the general public and the property owner when they apply for a sign permit.”

  • Tree trimming begins Monday in LA, WR

     Preventing power outages and unsafe fire hazards by trimming trees too close to power lines is a safety and reliability priority for the Los Alamos Dept. of Public Utilities (DPU). The DPU has engaged Allied Tree Service to trim around the overhead power lines in White Rock and Los Alamos starting Monday.

    The tree trimming project is anticipated to last 2‐3 months with work beginning at the Ski Hill, then moving to White Rock, then the Los Alamos town site. The tree trimming is necessary to prevent trees from coming into contact with power lines and touching un‐insulated wires which can lead to power outages.

    The DPU will make every attempt to notify nearby affected residents and businesses one week in advance of tree trimming work in their area. Trimming will occur within designated utility easements and the DPU asks the public to allow the trimming crews to access these areas.

     For more information contact Deputy Utility Manager for Electric Distribution Rafael De La Torre (rafael.delatorre@lacnm.us) or Michael Salazar (Michael.salazar@lacnm.us) or call the 311 Customer Care Center at 662‐8333.    

  • US government launches new immigration program

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Young illegal aliens are scrambling to get passports and other records in order as the Homeland Security Department starts accepting applications to allow them to avoid deportation and get work permits.

    Homeland Security announced the details Tuesday of what documents illegal aliens would need to prove that they are eligible for the Obama administration's Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. The announcement came a day before U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services was set to begin letting people apply for the program.

    Hundreds of thousands of illegal aliens potentially could benefit from the program, which President Barack Obama announced in June. The program is beginning just months before what promises to be a tight contest for the White House in which the Hispanic vote may play an important role.

    Obama has come under fire from Hispanic voters and others who say he hasn't fulfilled a previous campaign promise to overhaul the nation's immigration laws. The policy change could stop deportations for more than 1 million young illegal aliens who would have qualified for the failed DREAM Act, formally the Development, Relief and Education of Alien Minors Act, which Obama has supported in the past.