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Local News

  • Radioactive water leaks from crippled Japan plant--video extra

    RIKUZENTAKATA, Japan (AP) — Japan's prime minister surveyed the damage in a town gutted by a massive tsunami, as officials said Saturday that highly radioactive water was leaking into the sea from the nuclear plant stricken by the disaster.

    The Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear complex has been spewing radioactivity since March 11, when a magnitude-9.0 earthquake and ensuing wave knocked out power, disabling cooling systems and allowing radiation to seep out of the overheating reactors.

    Prime Minister Naoto Kan went to the plant and flew over the tsunami-damaged coast soon after the wave hit, but Saturday was the first time he set foot in one of the pulverized towns.

  • No decision yet on transit funding

    Los Alamos residents were out in force Friday afternoon for the North Central Regional Transit District Board meeting at the Pajarito Cliffs Conference Room.

    They let their voices be heard regarding the NCRTD's plans for funding allocation. But in the end, no action was taken, because funding allocation was just a discussion item on the agenda.

    NCRTD consultant Tony Mortillaro, the former county administrator, presented four different scenarios, and Los Alamos County Councilor Mike Wismer submitted an alternative scenario. The scenarios are listed with this report at lamonitor.com.

    Mortillaro said after the meeting all the figures he used in his report were extracted from Los Alamos County.

  • Update 04-01-11

    Board meeting
    The Fuller Lodge Historic District Advisory Board will meet from noon-1:30 p.m. Wednesday at the community building’s training room.

    Library Board meeting
    Los Alamos County Library Board will hold its regular meeting at 5:30 p.m. Monday in Mesa Public Library.

    County Council
    The County Council will meet at 7 p.m. April 5 at the Chambers in the Community Building.

     Dark Night
    The Pajarito Astronomers will host its first county sponsored Dark Night of 2011 at 7:30 p.m. April 2 at Spirio Soccer Field, Overlook Park.

  • President: Budget spending compromise within reach

    President Barack Obama says Democrats and Republicans are close to an agreement on the amount of spending cuts needed in order to keep the government operating and avoid a government shutdown.
    Obama says there are details and differences to work out, but he says a compromise is within reach.
    The president made the comments during a visit Friday to a shipping facility in Landover, Md. He spoke shortly after the release of a positive jobs report for March.
    Obama said it would be “the height of irresponsibility” to shut down the government as the economy starts to recover. Lawmakers must reach an agreement by April 8 in order to avoid a shutdown.
    Both sides are discussing cutting spending by an amount in the $33 billion range.

  • Interim CEO named for LAMC

    The Los Alamos Medical Center today announced that F. Curtis Smith has been named interim CEO while a national search for a permanent CEO is underway.  Smith assumes the top leadership role on an interim basis following the resignation of Wally Vette, according to Don Bivacca, President of the National Division of LifePoint Hospitals of which LAMC is a part.
    “We are fortunate to have Curt Smith serve as our interim CEO at Los Alamos as we launch an aggressive national search for qualified candidates to fill the top leadership role on a permanent basis,” said Bivacca.  “Curt has considerable healthcare management experience and will ensure strong management and leadership during this transition.”

  • Early morning swim

    A small group of ducks  took advantage of the pleasant weather this morning and did a few laps around Ashley Pond.

  • County eyes its own radio system

    A Department of Homeland Security grant could help the county council determine whether or not to invest millions of dollars in an upgrade of the county’s public safety communications system.

    Los Alamos County Council voted 6-1 to approve a $68,775 New Mexico Department of Homeland Security and Emergency Management grant during a meeting in March.

    Councilor Vincent Chiravalle cast the lone no vote.

    The grant will be used to expand on a 2009 study that looked at optic fiber, broadband and radio, Emergency Management Coordinator Phil Taylor told the Los Alamos Monitor. Crestino Telecommunications Solutions, a consulting firm based in Albuquerque, conducted the study under the county’s information and technology department.

  • FBI takes aim at public corruption

    The FBI in Albuquerque and its law enforcement partners have announced several initiatives designed to make it easier for New Mexico residents to report public corruption and for the FBI and its partners to work more effectively together.

    A new hotline is available for anyone wanting to report public corruption to the FBI in Albuquerque.

    Public corruption undermines the nation’s security and the people’s trust in their government while wasting billions of tax dollars, said Albuquerque FBI Public Affairs Specialist Frank Fisher Foster, adding that public corruption includes corrupt public officials, border corruption, economic stimulus fraud, abuse of government contracting authority and many other examples.

  • Spring has sprung

    A variety of bulbs have bloomed - proof that spring has arrived in Los Alamos.

  • PNM request for interim rate relief rejected

    SANTA FE — The New Mexico Public Regulation Commission has rejected a request by the state’s largest electric utility for interim relief as regulators consider whether to approve a proposed rate increase.
    The commission turned down Public Service Company of New Mexico’s request on Thursday.
    PNM wanted to begin the first phase of an $85 million rate increase that was negotiated by the utility and other groups as part of a stipulation that has yet to be considered by the commission.
    The interim rate increase would have totaled $45 million.
    The commission’s general counsel found that PNM failed to show immediate irreparable harm in its filing for interim relief.