Local News

  • Correction 02-03-12

    There were two reporting errors in the “Broadband moves forward” article in Wednesday’s Los Alamos Monitor. “100 gigabits today is probably fine, but it won’t be next year” should have read “100 mbps,” and the cost of the 90 percent phase of the study is  $182,500, not $1,825,500.

  • House OKs proposals to revamp regulatory agency 

    SANTA FE (AP) — Proposals to streamline New Mexico’s utility regulatory agency and establish minimum qualifications for its elected members sped through the House on Thursday.
    Supporters contend the proposals to revamp the Public Regulation Commission will make it more efficient and should ensure that elected regulators are better prepared for the increasingly complex utility and telecommunications issues they must decide.
    “This is a baby step, but it is a step in the right direction in trying to improve the actions that this particular agency is taking,” said Rep. Larry Larranaga, an Albuquerque Republican.

  • Update 02-03-12

    BPU meeting

    The Board of Public Utilities will meet at 5:30 p.m.
    Feb. 15, at the DPU Conference Room, 170 Central Park Square.

    Shuttle service

    The Los Alamos County Recreation Division and Atomic City Transit will run shuttle service on Saturday from the Aquatic Center Parking Lot to the Ice Rink and back from 5—7 p.m. The service is to help alleviate parking issues for the New Mexico Renegades game at 5:30 p.m.

    Council meeting

    The County Council will meet at 7 p.m. Feb. 7 in Council Chambers.

    Ashley Pond

    A public meeting regarding Ashley Pond will be at 6:30 p.m Feb. 9. in the Community Building Council Chambers

    Reading event

  • Board mulls Historic District improvements

    While most of the attention Wednesday night was focused on Los Alamos High School and the county council chambers, the Historical Districts Advisory Board also was busy.

    Members of the board met at Fuller Lodge, to discuss upcoming projects involving maintenance and improvements, the placement of historical sculptures within the district and the upcoming Historic Homestead Tour Dedication.

    The board also welcomed new member, Mark Rayburn, who replaced Ron Wilkins.

  • Protesters pan plutonium plan

    Catherine Montano of Las Vegas made a 51-minute presentation to DOE and NNSA officials during a scoping meeting for the Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement at Cities of Gold Hotel Thursday night in Pojoaque. For more on the scoping meeting, pick up a Sunday edition of the Los Alamos Monitor.

  • Firefighters OK new contract

    Just over a year ago Los Alamos Firefighters’ Association Local 3279 filed a lawsuit against the county for its decision to impose a contract on firefighters without their consent.

    This year a new system called Interest Based Bargaining (IBB) helped firefighters and the county reach a win/win contract, praised by both sides at Tuesday’s council meeting.

    Previous negotiations were conducted using positional bargaining; an adversarial technique in which each side stakes out a fixed position and one side’s gain is the other’s loss.

    IBB helps the parties reach consensus through understanding each other’s interests.

  • Trump Backs Romney, Despite Gingrich Staff Claim

    Donald Trump on Thursday announced his endorsement of Mitt Romney for president, saying the former Massachusetts governor is "not going to allow bad things to continue to happen to this country we all love."

  • Navajo teams up with lab on tribal energy policy

    FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — One of the country’s largest American Indian tribes has partnered with a national laboratory to study what technologies would be best for developing natural resources on the vast reservation.
    The Navajo Nation has large deposits of coal and uranium, along with potential for wind and solar energy, but it hasn’t historically been a major player in developing those resources. The tribe signed a three-year agreement with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on Wednesday to look into carbon capture and sequestration, clean coal technology and renewable energy, among other things.
    Navajo President Ben Shelly said the expertise of leading scientists and engineers will lead to better investments for the tribe.

  • Agencies focus on prevention efforts

    Beginning in August 2011, two not-for-profit organizations were granted contracts by the County of Los Alamos to provide substance abuse and suicide prevention and early intervention programs that would reduce the risks that contribute to substance abuse and suicidal behaviors among school age youth.
    Hands Across Cultures Corporation (HACC) addresses the high rates of families and youth experiencing human service related problems, particularly through disease prevention and health promotion efforts. A major focus is alcohol, tobacco, and other drug (ATOD) abuse behavior in Northern Santa Fe, Southern Rio Arriba, and Los Alamos Counties.

  • Groundhog: Six more weeks of winter

    PUNXSUTAWNEY, Pa. (AP) — Pennsylvania’s Punxsutawney Phil emerged from his lair to “see” his shadow on Thursday, in the process predicting six more weeks of winter.
    But, at this rate, that might not be so bad.
    The groundhog made his “prediction” on Gobbler’s Knob, a tiny hill in the town for which he’s named about 65 miles northeast of Pittsburgh.
    Temperatures were near freezing when he emerged at dawn — unseasonably warm — and were forecast to climb into the mid-40s in a winter that’s brought little snow and only a few notably cold days to much of the East.