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Local News

  • Manager accuses employee of embezzlement

    No one knows for sure what’s going on at the Quizno’s Deli, located at 172 Central Park Square. 

    According to police, trouble at the eatery began Aug. 28 when the store’s manager, Pedro Diaz, reported to police that one of the sandwich shop’s employees allegedly stole money from the store.

    The alleged theft happened Aug. 27 when an employee named Andrew Martinez showed up at the store complaining that his paycheck bounced. 

    According to Diaz, Martinez quit working at the store Aug. 8 and was given his last check Aug. 10. Martinez apparently cashed it Aug. 13. 

  • DOE lengthens comment period

    WASHINGTON, D.C. — The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration has given the public an additional 15 days and a fourth hearing in New Mexico to comment on the Draft Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement. 

    The Draft Supplemental EIS analyzes the potential environmental impacts of alternatives for the disposition of 7.1 metric tons (MT) of additional weapons-usable plutonium from pits that were declared surplus to national defense needs in 2007 but were not included in DOE’s prior decisions as well as 6 MT of surplus, weapons-usable non-pit plutonium. 

  • Dept. of Public Utilities investigating gas outage

    It is ironic that the Department of Public Utilities (DPU) was attempting to install an alternative high-pressure natural gas line to North Mesa to reinforce service to the area when the installation caused the line to depressurize Wednesday. Crews have been working ever since to restore service to approximately 800 customers.

    According to DPU Manager John Arrowsmith, utility staff believes they have determined the cause of the incident, but will need to run tests to confirm their assessment. 

    “A year or so ago, we installed slam-shut valves in two pressure reducing valve stations on North Mesa as a safety measure,” Arrowsmith said.

    “About two weeks ago a contractor putting in a fiber optics cable drilled through a low-pressure line on North Mesa. The punctured line was isolated and replaced. 

  • Today in History for September 7th
  • Reiss named to LA County Council

    The Los Alamos County Council met in a special session Thursday night to select a replacement for Ron Selvage, who resigned just more than a month ago due to personal reasons.

    The council decided on Rick Reiss, a Republican, who has lived in Los Alamos 20 years. He has served on the Planning and Zoning Commission, the Airport Board and various ad-hoc committees, including one for county attorney selection and one for a county bond issue to support the Trinity Site redevelopment.

    Reiss has also served with the Kiwanis, Los Alamos Community Foundation and Los Alamos Public Schools Foundation and was co-chair for the United Way with his wife.

    Seven candidates sent in letters of interest before the Aug. 28 deadline and were interviewed by council. The candidates were Edward Birnbaum (D), John Bliss (R), Stephen Boerigter (I), Andrea Cunningham (D), Phillip Kunsberg (declined to state party affiliation), Ralph Phelps (R) and Reiss.

    The session began with each candidate giving three-minute statements about their background and reasons for running. 

  • Raw Video: Gabby Giffords Leads Pledge at DNC
  • Big Restaurant Chains Accused of Cheating Servers
  • 09-06-12 Briefs

    Judge: Anti-Wi-Fi advocate can’t detect signal

     

    SANTA FE  (AP) — A judge has ruled that a Santa Fe man who claims that his neighbor’s wireless service has caused him physical harm cannot “cannot reliably detect” the alleged electromagnetic stimuli that he says is hurting him.

    The Albuquerque Journal reports that District Judge Sarah Singleton recently ruled anti-Wi-Fi advocate Arthur Firstenberg “cannot discern or discriminate the effects of anxiety caused by a testing situation or the presence of electromagnetic stimulus.”

    However, Singleton did rule that Firstenberg can still try to prove damages for injuries or pain and suffering.

  • Board seeks input on bond ordinance

    The school district is preparing to issue up to $20 million in general obligation bonds to fix aging infrastructure and it wants your input on how to spend it.  

    Though the school board has already had meetings with the public and its Facilities Strategic Planning Committee, it will have another public meeting at Los Alamos High School Sept. 12.  

    Also, board members are urging the voting public to contact the school board through its email addresses on its web site. 

    Education officials also emphasized that this bond issuance will not raise property taxes, as this issuance is a complement to the 2009 bond sale, a sale that was approved by voters to fund the school district’s long range, capital improvement plan.

  • Arts, Music Lovers Have Their Say

    Supporters of the arts and music made their presence known Tuesday night during a school board meeting centering on how to spend the next $20 million in general obligation bonds for school infrastructure. 

    A ballot where people can vote for or against the bond issue is due to be sent out sometime early in January. 

    During the board meeting, when a special committee appointed to oversee the bond distribution presented an $18 million wish list of  improvements for many of the district’s schools, a very vocal group in the audience quickly took issue with the $1.6 million allotted to renovations to Los Alamos High School’s music facilities.