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Local News

  • No monkeying around: Richardson opposes chimp transfer

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) -- Gov. Bill Richardson is asking to tour a former medical research lab in southern New Mexico that houses more than 200 chimpanzees.

    Richardson made the comment Tuesday after meeting in Bethesda, Md. with officials of the National Institutes of Health, which contracts with a private company to care for the chimps.

    The contract expires next year and Richardson opposes a plan by the agency to transfer the chimps from the Alamogordo Primate Facility, where they are no longer used for medical testing.

  • New Mexico’s first hybrid truck arrives in LA

    You may think of a garbage truck as just being a big truck that hauls away all the unwanted, broken and used up items. But the new garbage truck acquired by Los Alamos County this week has something extra to offer the community – a quality no other garbage truck in the state provides.

  • Affordable housing gets a break

    The Los Alamos County Council Tuesday in a move to boost affordable housing approved a process that will give developers a discount on land.

    Called the Land Donation and Land Discount Program, a system will be created to use public land in a cost-effective way, said Steven Brugger, housing programs manager.

  • Property inspections start in White Rock

    To ensure records are accurate, the county assessor’s office conducts physical property inspections, which in Los Alamos happens about every five years.

    “We are on a yearly cycle and we divide the community up into five areas so each area is inspected about every five years,” County Assessor JoAnn Johnson said.

    Appraisers from Johnson’s office are conducting the regulatory required inspections from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday-Friday, in the White Rock 1 and 2 additions and the White Rock Canyon subdivisions.

  • Surface of Gulf cleaner, but questions lurk in deep water

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Researchers are warning that the Gulf of Mexico oil spill is a bigger mess than the government claims and that a lot of crude is lurking deep below the surface, some of it settling perhaps in a critical undersea canyon off the Florida Panhandle.

    The evidence of microscopic amounts of oil mixing into the soil of the canyon was gathered by scientists at the University of South Florida, who also found poisoned plant plankton — the vital base of the ocean food web — which they blamed on a toxic brew of oil and dispersants.

  • San Ildefonso Pueblo goes back to its future

    Not more than a dozen miles from a high-profile lab so cutting edge that PhDs come and go like New York taxi drivers and high tech is old hat, the soil is worked hard — by hand — just like it was worked more than 400 years ago.

    Knees bend and backs hurt.

    Ancient farm implements wrestle with the dirt so that in a month or so, corn can be harvested, plucked from their rows by the same hands that planted them.

    At Pueblo de San Ildefonso, it’s the old days, all over again.

  • Baghdad bloodbath: Suicide bomber targets army recruits, 61 dead

    BAGHDAD (AP) — A suicide bomber sat for hours Tuesday among hundreds of army recruits before detonating nail-packed explosives strapped to his body, killing 61 people and casting new doubt on the ability of Iraqi forces as U.S. troops head home.

  • Power outage pummels LA

    A lightning strike Sunday left about 3,500 homes without power for nearly 4.5 hours in Los Alamos.

     John Arrowsmith, Department of Public Utilities manager, said North Mesa, Barranca Mesa, sections of the North Community and Quemazon were affected by the power outage, which started between 5 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Sunday.

    Other areas did not experience a loss of power, including the Los Alamos Medical Center, a spokeswoman said.

    The outage was sparked when lightning struck an overhead line at the Pueblo Canyon crossing near Walnut Park.

  • Play portrays life at the lab

    After spending 30 years at Los Alamos National Laboratory in what he called a “good” career, Robert Benjamin is blazing a new trail, this time as a playwright.

    Benjamin’s latest work, “Broken Hammer,” is being produced by Umbrella Hat Productions, a nonprofit organization based in New York City.

    A staged reading will take place at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday at the Armory for the Arts on Old Pecos Trail next to the Santa Fe Children’s Museum in Santa Fe.

  • Nobel winner takes ‘time’ for Oppenheimer memorial

    It’s all around us.

    Songwriters write about it. Movies twist it, torque it and terrify us with it.

    It passes by too fast. It goes too slow.

    In the end, it runs out on us all.

    And as pervasive as it is, says a reknowned scientist who has spent much of his life studying it, we do not get it.

    “I claim we still don’t understand what time is,” said Ahmed H. Zewail, Nobel laureate.

    Zewail spoke Monday at the J. Robert Oppenheimer Memorial Committee 40th Memorial Lecture.

    His topic?