Local News

  • State, federal officials weigh in

    Reaction was swift on the state and national front after the Los Alamos National Laboratory announced a voluntary separation program that would eliminate 400-800 jobs.
    Governor Susana Martinez’s spokesperson Scott Darnell said “the Governor is very concerned about the potential impact of these federal cuts on the economy of northern New Mexico. She also believes these cuts are yet another by-product of the dysfunction in Washington D.C. and the inability to appropriately prioritize national defense and national security in federal spending decisions.”

  • State Briefs 02-22-12

    Martinez plans to sign proposal

    SANTA FE — Gov. Susana Martinez plans to sign legislation that supporters say can help New Mexicans find hospitals that offer the most up-to-date care for stroke patients.
    The legislation calls for the state to certify hospitals as a “stroke center” if they are accredited by an independent, nonprofit group called the Joint Commission, which sets standards for health care programs.
    The governor’s office says Martinez plans to sign the legislation on Wednesday in Albuquerque at a luncheon that’s part of a national campaign to increase awareness about heart disease among women.

  • UNM-LA to offer paralegal, IT courses

    Area residents interested in pursuing a paralegal career will have the opportunity to earn a Paralegal Certificate through an online course being offered beginning March 5, 2012, by UNM-Los Alamos in partnership with the Center for Legal Studies, a Colorado company that provides students with affordable and effective legal education through colleges across the nation.

  • Employee memo outlines why lab is taking action

    The Los Alamos Monitor obtained a memo that was sent from Los Alamos National Laboratory Director Charlie McMillan to employees Tuesday regarding the plans for a voluntary separation program.

    McMillan led an all-hands meeting Tuesday to discuss the program and the memo illustrates the three reasons why the lab is taking the action.

    The memo reads:

    • Our current budget and future financial outlook require significant cost-cutting to position the Lab for FY13 and beyond. In FY12 alone, we face a budget reduction of around $300 million across multiple programs.  
    • By implementing a voluntary separation plan, we mitigate the possibility of an involuntary separation program later; and 

  • Argentine train slams into station, 100s injured

    BUENOS AIRES, Argentina (AP) — A packed train slammed into the end of the line in Buenos Aires' busy Once station Wednesday, injuring at least 340 morning commuters, Argentina's transportation secretary said.

    "There are people still trapped, people alive, and there may have been fatalities. We don't know if there are dead people" in the wreckage, J.P. Schiavi told reporters at the station.

    The commuter train came in too fast and hit the barrier at the end of the platform at about 12 mph (20 kph), smashing the front of the engine and crunching the leading cars behind it, Schiavi said. One car penetrated nearly 20 feet (six meters) into the next, he said.

  • Ga. Authorities Say 5 Dead in Spa Shooting

    Authorities say five people are dead in an apparent murder-suicide at a suburban Atlanta spa. Officials say officers found the bodies after responding to a call of a person shot Tuesday night at the Su Jung Health Sauna.

  • LANL plans workforce reduction

    Back in December, Los Alamos National Laboratory Director Charlie McMillan announced the formation of a task force that would make financial decisions that would account for $300 million in savings at the lab because of budget constraints.

    Everybody found out Tuesday how that would happen.

    Los Alamos National Laboratory Director Charlie McMillan said the lab has submitted a plan to the National Nuclear Security Administration proposing to reduce its workforce by between 400 and 800 employees this spring through a voluntary separation program.

    McMillan made the announcement at an all-hands meeting at the lab Tuesday afternoon.

  • State Briefs 02-21-12

    Governor signs anti-corruption bill

    ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — Gov. Susana Martinez has signed into law legislation that could require public officials convicted of corruption-related crimes to give back to the state their salaries and forfeit their accrued state pension benefits.
    The new law takes effect May 16.
    The former prosecutor said in a statement the measure sends a message that corruption in New Mexico will not stand.
    Lawyer settles claim in Vaughan case

    ALBUQUERQUE— The lawyer credited with giving Albuquerque real estate executive and admitted Ponzi schemer Doug Vaughan the idea for raising cash through promissory notes has reached a settlement in the case.

  • State proposes to overhaul Medicaid program

    SANTA FE (AP) — Gov. Susana Martinez’s administration is proposing to overhaul a program that provides health care to a fourth of the state’s population, and the changes could require some needy New Mexicans to dig into their pockets to pay a fee if they go to an emergency room for medical care that’s not considered an emergency.
    One of the goals of the planned revision is to slow the rate of growth in Medicaid, which accounts for 16 percent of this year’s state budget and costs New Mexico taxpayers nearly $1 billion.

  • The final days of the session

    The final week of the session proved to be alternatively busy or boring, but always unpredictable.   As required in the constitution, the session ended promptly at noon on Thursday.   No actions after noon on the 30th day of even year sessions are constitutional.  
    This session ended with a filibuster by Representative Stewart that killed the Governor’s social promotion bill (Senate Bill 96).   This came after Representative Roch filibustered the General Obligation Bond bill (Senate Bill 66) that funds major capital projects for more than an hour.
    By 1:30PM nearly everyone—Senators, Representatives, staff, and citizens--had departed and the Roundhouse almost empty and eerily quiet.