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Local News

  • LAPD makes profiling policy more accessible

    It’s amazing what one phone call can do.

    The Los Alamos Police Department found this out recently when it received a “B” grade in a racial profiling survey published by two New Mexico-based civil rights groups: Somos Un Pueblo Unido and the New Mexico State Conference NAACP.

    The survey, titled “Biased Based Policing at a Glance,” surveyed law enforcement agencies across New Mexico to see whether or not they even had policies that guarded against racial profiling. If they did, then they were further graded on how accessible those policies were to the public.

  • Council debates size of sewer rate hikes

    Replacing Los Alamos County’s aging sewage infrastructure is unavoidable, which means rate hikes are inevitable. How much those hikes will be and how they will be implemented was the topic of discussion during the county council’s work session Tuesday.

    Council approved a 10 percent rate increase in 2011 to help reduce the funding deficit for capital improvements and operating costs.

    At that time, the Department of Public Utilities (DPU) projected a 20 percent increase in FY2013 to replace aging infrastructure, pay annual operating expenses and pay off the loan for the Los Alamos Waste Water Treatment Plant (LAWWTP). At the time, councilors urged DPU officials to look for alternatives to the rate increase.

  • Larry the Lobster off the menu

    WATERFORD, Conn. (AP) — A Connecticut man purchased a 17-pound lobster at a Waterford restaurant, then released the crustacean back into Long Island Sound.

    Don MacKenzie of Niantic tells The Day of New London he knew the lobster, nicknamed "Lucky Larry" by local children, would have to be about 80-years-old to reach his current size and felt it deserved to live.

    MacKenzie won't say how much he paid The Dock restaurant to take Larry off the menu.

    He took the lobster back to sea Tuesday, releasing it in a secret location.

  • Today in History for July 25th
  • Alleged shooter was surrounded by brain experts

    CENTENNIAL, Colo. (AP) — James Holmes spent a year in a small neuroscience doctoral program, surrounded by scientists and roughly three dozen classmates delving into the inner workings of the brain.

    The University of Colorado, Denver, isn't saying if they had any warning signs.

    Experts say, however, the intimacy of the program and its focus on the brain may not have been enough for staff and students to detect that Holmes was on a course that police say ended with a deadly rampage at a midnight showing of the new Batman movie.

  • CDC: More Teens Using Condoms
  • Hovering Storm Clouds

    Storm clouds gather over the Jemez Mountains and Los Alamos around noon today.

  • Map to outline forest roads open under new plan

    SANTA FE (AP) — A map expected to be released this fall will let visitors to Santa Fe National Forest know where they cannot travel.
    All national forests are required to create the so-called travel management plans to control the impact of motorized vehicles on natural resources.
    The northern New Mexico forest released its plan earlier this year, banning motorized travel on more than half of the roads, trails and routes on its 1.6 million acres.
    Hunters, anglers, campers and off-road enthusiasts will need to consult a map to find out whether they still can travel on their favorite roads and trails, the Santa Fe New Mexican reported.

  • Map to outline forest roads open under new plan

    SANTA FE (AP) — A map expected to be released this fall will let visitors to Santa Fe National Forest know where they cannot travel.
    All national forests are required to create the so-called travel management plans to control the impact of motorized vehicles on natural resources.
    The northern New Mexico forest released its plan earlier this year, banning motorized travel on more than half of the roads, trails and routes on its 1.6 million acres.
    Hunters, anglers, campers and off-road enthusiasts will need to consult a map to find out whether they still can travel on their favorite roads and trails, the Santa Fe New Mexican reported.

  • Flash Flood Warning until 4 p.m. Tuesday

    THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN ALBUQUERQUE HAS ISSUED A