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Local News

  • Police: Mail bomb could have exploded over US

    LONDON (AP) — A mail bomb intercepted last month at an English airport could have exploded over the East Coast of the United States, British police said Wednesday.

    Forensic evidence showed the device, originally sent from Yemen by way of Cologne, Germany, was timed to be detonated about six to seven hours after the cargo aircraft carrying it left the U.K. for the U.S. The package was removed by police in Britain during transit.

  • Deficit panel leaders' plan curbs Social Security

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Leaders of President Barack Obama's bipartisan deficit commission on Wednesday proposed reducing the annual cost-of-living increases in Social Security, part of a bold plan to control $1 trillion-plus budget deficits.

    The proposal also would set a tough target for curbing the growth of Medicare and recommends looking at eliminating popular tax breaks, such as mortgage interest deduction.

  • Ex-senator heads gov.-elect's inaugural committee

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — Retired U.S. Sen. Pete Domenici will serve as honorary chairman of Gov.-elect Susana Martinez's inaugural committee.

    Martinez announced Domenici's appointment on Tuesday and said Andrea Goff of Hobbs will be the inaugural committee's executive director.

    Goff works as an independent fundraiser.

    Martinez said at a news conference that private money will finance her inaugural activities. The Republican takes office on Jan. 1.


     

  • COUNCIL GREEN LIGHTS TRINITY SITE DEVELOPER

    The long-awaited Trinity Site retail development became one step closer to fruition Tuesday night as the Los Alamos County Council gave the green light for county officials to begin negotiations with North American Development Group.

  • US approval of arms pact with Russia looking shaky

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate approval of President Barack Obama's nuclear arms treaty with Russia, which once looked close to a sure thing, is now in jeopardy.

    The administration is scrambling to get enough Republican support in the Senate to ratify the New START treaty before the Democrats' majority shrinks by six in January. But Republicans have little incentive to give Obama a big political boost after leaving him reeling from their strong gains in last week's congressional elections.

  • House veterans to newcomers: Sweat the small stuff

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Be work horses, not show horses. Choose details over drama. The small stuff? Sweat it. And do it fast.

    Republicans retaking control of the House in January are getting lessons from veterans of the past two transitions of power on Capitol Hill — 1994, when the GOP last took control of Congress, and 2006, when Democrats grabbed it back. Lesson No. 1: They have a short window to convince the public they're serious about changing the way Washington works.

  • Update 11-09-10

    County council meeting
    Los Alamos County Council meets at 7 p.m. Tuesday in the Community Building at 20th and Central Avenue. The meeting is open to the public.

    Property tax bills mailed last week

  • Public hearing reviews three more proposals

    Residents filled the seats and it became standing room only in the council chambers for Monday’s Capital Improvement Project (CIP) public hearing. In a show of force, teens were clad in neon colored T-shirts and environmentalists sported butterfly buttons as they pled their cases to the CIP Evaluation and Oversight Committee.

  • World’s largest laser sets record

    The National Nuclear Security Administration’s National Ignition Facility (NIF) has set world records for neutron yield and laser energy delivered from laser-driven capsules to an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target.
    NIF researchers will report on these and other recent experimental results this week at the annual meeting of the American Physical Society Division of Plasma Physics in Chicago.

  • New Mexico cave closes to protect bats

    White nose syndrome is spreading west quickly
    Federal and state land management agencies will enact partial closures for some caves and abandoned mines on public lands in New Mexico in response to the spread of white-nose syndrome (WNS), a disease affecting bats. WNS is responsible for the death of more than 1 million bats in the eastern United States and Canada.