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Local News

  • US sees few good options if Yemen government falls

    WASHINGTON (AP) — For two years, the Obama administration has had a relationship of convenience with Yemen: The U.S. kept the Yemeni government armed and flush with cash. In return, Yemen's leaders helped fight al-Qaida or, as often, looked the other way while the U.S. did.

    That relationship is about to get a lot less convenient.

    Of all the uprisings and protests that have swept the Middle East this year, none is more likely than Yemen to have immediate damaging effects on U.S. counterterrorism efforts. Yemen is home to al-Qaida's most active franchise, and as President Ali Abdullah Saleh's government crumbles, so does Washington's influence there.

  • Libya rebels struggle to regroup; US jet crashes

    AJDABIYA, Libya (AP) — Moammar Gadhafi's forces shelled rebels regrouping outside a strategic eastern city on Tuesday and his snipers and tanks controlled the streets of the last opposition-held city in the west, signaling a prolonged battle ahead. An American fighter jet crashed over North African country, both crew ejecting safely.

    The U.S. Africa Command said both crewmembers were safe after what was believed to be a mechanical failure of the Air Force F-15.

    Disorganization among the rebels could hamper their attempts to exploit the air campaign by U.S. and European militaries. Since the uprising began on Feb. 15, the opposition has been made up of disparate groups even as it took control of the entire east of the country.

  • Gadhafi's forces, Libyan rebels face standoff--video

    AJDABIYA, Libya (AP) — Moammar Gadhafi's forces lobbed artillery shells at rebels regrouping outside a strategic eastern city, forcing a band of fighters to scatter and signaling a prolonged battle as the U.S. said it was shifting its focus to widening a no-fly zone across the North African country.

    The first round of the allied assault over the weekend smashed a column of regime tanks that had been moving on the rebel stronghold of Benghazi in the east, reversing the government's advance and allowing the rebels to barrel to west, vowing to break a siege on Ajdabiya, a city of 140,000 that is the gateway to the east.

  • Missing Virginia teacher's body located in Japan

    RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — A Virginia couple is mourning the death of their daughter after learning that her body was found in disaster-ravaged Japan, where she had been teaching English.

    Taylor Anderson, 24, could be the first known American victim in the Japan disaster as authorities continue the daunting task of finding and identifying almost 13,000 people believed to be missing.

    Anderson's family said in a statement that the U.S. Embassy in Japan called them Monday to tell them she was found in Ishinomaki, a city about 240 miles (390 kilometers) north of Tokyo.

  • Pool boils at Japan nuke plant as evacuees weary

    FUKUSHIMA, Japan (AP) — Weariness and anxiety percolated Tuesday among people who left their homes near Japan's radiation-shedding nuclear complex as workers tried urgently to cool an overheated storage pool and methodically to reconnect critical cooling systems.

    In another day of progress and setbacks, a pool holding spent nuclear fuel heated up to around the boiling point, a nuclear safety official said. With water bubbling away, there is a risk that more radioactive steam could spew out. "We cannot leave this alone and we must take care of it as quickly as possible," said the official, Hidehiko Nishiyama.

  • No quick fix seen at Japan's nuclear plant

    FUKUSHIMA, Japan (AP) — Officials raced Monday to restore electricity to Japan's leaking nuclear plant, but getting the power flowing will hardly be the end of their battle: With its mangled machinery and partly melted reactor cores, bringing the complex under control is a monstrous job.

    Restoring the power to all six units at the tsunami-damaged complex is key, because it will, in theory, power up the maze of motors, valves and switches that help deliver cooling water to the overheated reactor cores and spent fuel pools that are leaking radiation.

  • AP Sources: Pawlenty to form White House committee

    ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — Tim Pawlenty, the former Minnesota governor struggling for name recognition against better-known Republicans eying the presidency, told supporters on Monday that he will take the first formal step toward seeking the nomination, The Associated Press has learned.

  • Cruise missile blasts Gadhafi's compound--see video


    TRIPOLI, Libya (AP) — A cruise missile blasted Moammar Gadhafi's residential compound in an attack that carried as much symbolism as military effect, and fighter jets destroyed a line of tanks moving on the rebel capital. The U.S. said the international assault would hit any government forces attacking the opposition.

  • Workers flee Japan nuke plant as smoke rises--watch video

    FUKUSHIMA, Japan (AP) — Gray smoke rose from two reactor units Monday, temporarily stalling critical work to reconnect power lines and restore cooling systems to stabilize Japan's radiation-leaking nuclear complex.

    Workers are racing to bring the nuclear plant under control, but the process is proceeding in fits and starts, stalled by incidents like the smoke and by the need to work methodically to make sure wiring, pumps and other machinery can be safely switched on.

  • Dozens of puppies may be euthanized unless adopted

    LAS CRUCES, N.M. (AP) — Plans by the city-county animal shelter in Las Cruces to euthanize about 50 puppies will be re-evaluated after a weekend rush of adoptions.

    Kennel supervisor Paul Richardson says the number of expected euthanizations is way down because people came to the Animal Services Center of the Mesilla Valley after hearing about the plans.

    Richardson says 17 puppies were adopted Saturday and the shelter was on track to do about the same on Sunday. That's way above normal.