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Local News

  • Udall requests post-Thanksgiving hearing on travel tales

    U.S. Sen. Tom Udall, D-N.M., is asking Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee Chairman Jay Rockefeller to convene a hearing following the Thanksgiving holiday to focus on airline travelers’ experiences with the screening measures recently implemented by the Transportation Security Administration (TSA).

  • New face at the county

    Seeing an idea be transformed into an actual building is one of the perks Bryan Aragon, 34, said he enjoys about his new job as a project manager for the Capital Projects and Facilities Department.
    “What’s really great about the work I do is I can drive down the road and say, ‘I helped build that building’ to family and friends,” he said.
    Aragon, who has worked in his new position for about a month, is already involved in bringing several projects into fruition.

  • Chief stops road rage incident

    While driving along N.M. 4 near Karen Circle early Tuesday afternoon, Los Alamos Police Chief Wayne Torpy came upon a scene resembling something out of an action movie.
    A truck was parked in the middle of the highway and the driver was wielding a 3-foot-long metal jack handle and waving it in the air. Torpy then caught sight of a cyclist who was clutching his bicycle in front of himself in a protective manner against the threatened blows from the rod.

  • Airport lines move smoothly despite warnings

    CHICAGO (AP) — The lines of Thanksgiving travelers moved quickly and smoothly at airports around the country Wednesday morning despite an Internet campaign to get passengers to gum up the works on one of the busiest days of the year by refusing full-body scans.

    The Transportation Security Administration said very few passengers opted out. And there were only scattered protesters at some airports.

  • Consumers spend and earn more, layoffs slow

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Americans earned more and spent more last month, and the number of people applying for unemployment benefits dropped last week to the lowest level in more than two years. At the same time, demand for long-lasting manufactured goods fell off.

  • SKorea reports 2 civilian deaths in NKorea clash

    INCHEON, South Korea (AP) — Rescuers found the burned bodies Wednesday of two islanders killed in a North Korean artillery attack — the first civilian deaths from a skirmish that marked a dramatic escalation of tensions between the rival Koreas.

  • Colder, drier air en route for turkey day

    The National Weather Service issued the following Special Weather Statement Wednesday morning:

    MUCH COLDER AIR SPREADING FROM NORTHWEST TO SOUTHEAST LATER TODAY INTO THANKSGIVING... WIND ADVISORY FOR PORTIONS OF CENTRAL AND EASTERN NEW MEXICO TODAY...

  • Just over half of NM voters turned out in election

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — Slightly more than half of eligible New Mexico voters turned out and participated in this month's general election, according to official results announced Tuesday.

    A total of 607,700 New Mexicans cast ballots in the Nov. 2 election, representing 52.7 percent of those registered to vote.

    That's slightly better than 2006, the last gubernatorial election year, when the turnout rate was 52.2 percent, and about 568,600 voters participated. Turnout was 53 percent in the 2002 election.

  • Martinez picks NM budget official for review team

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — Gov.-elect Susana Martinez has selected a former state budget director to lead a team in reviewing the state Department of Finance and Administration.

    Martinez announced Tuesday that John Gasparich will serve as the team's chairman. He was deputy department secretary during part of former Gov. Gary Johnson's administration and budget director for former Govs. Garrey Carruthers and Toney Anaya.

  • Don’t get burned when trying to buy firewood

    Cooler temperatures and the smell of wood burning in stoves across New Mexico is a sure sign that fall is here and winter is right around the corner.
    “This time of year the temperature drops fast once the sun goes down, which means tens of thousands of New Mexicans will turn to their  woodstoves to help heat their homes,” said Noreen Jaramillo, New Mexico Department of Agriculture public information officer.
    “But residents need to be careful who they buy their wood from. If they aren’t, they could lose money.”