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Education

  • LAHS' Warnock is stepping down

    Los Alamos High School principal Sandra Warnock announced her intent to retire at the end of the school year during a Wednesday meeting with her staff.
    Shortly after the meeting, School Board President Jim Hall stated, “I am grateful for Ms. Warnock’s long service to the district. I will personally miss working with her.”
    Warnock is completing a 30-year career with Los Alamos Public Schools that began in 1984 as a special education teacher at the high school.
    Warnock served in that capacity for 22 years before accepting a position as an assistant principal at the high school. Warnock served as high school principal for the past four and a half years.
    Warnock said there were many aspects she loved about being principal, but it was the people she worked with she loved about it the most.
    “It was the people part of the job that I liked the most, as well the challenge of trying to make things better in the area of student achievement,” she said.
    Sherry Anderson, Math department chair, said “I think that Sandy has been a great principal. She has always tried to do what is best for the students and staff while being fair to everyone.”

  • Applications being taken for Russia trip

    The Los Alamos-Sarov Sister Cities Initiative (LASSCI) is seeking applications from High School students interested in a summer 2014 visit to Sarov, Russia.
    An information session for interested students and parents will be held at 1 p.m. Feb. 1. at the Mesa Public Library (3rd Floor, Rooms 2 and 3). Attendees will learn everything they need to know to consider participating in the summer 2014 trip.
    The purpose of the Summer Youth Exchange Program is to promote mutual understanding between our two cities and between our respective countries. Participating students will develop appreciation for both the similarities and differences of life in both communities, and learn about the history, the culture and everyday life.
    Visits under the Summer Youth Exchange Program involve 10 students accompanied by chaperones, and start with two days in Moscow for sightseeing and time-zone adjustment.
    The group then travels to the ‘secret’ city of Sarov.
    The program will include learning about the history of the town, touring attractions in the surrounding area, music and other cultural events, trying out new food, and meeting and just kicking back with Sarov students.
    Visitors will discover new things about themselves, form lasting friendships and, as previous participants have attested, have life-changing experiences.

  • AFT maps out its vision as state legislature looms

    SANTA FE — It was an afternoon of fiery speeches and goal setting Monday as the American Federation of Teachers New Mexico held a press conference in the rotunda of the capitol, putting legislators on notice they wanted changes in how the state manages public education.
    Those attending from Los Alamos included a group of retired teachers and current teachers, including Ryan Ross, Karyl Ann Armbruster, Jane Young, Shelby Redondo and Ellen Mills, who is also the president of AFT affiliate the Los Alamos Federation of School Employees.
    Speakers at the event included the National Federation of Teachers President Randi Weingarten, Vice President Kathy Chavez, AFT NM President Stephanie Ly, Santa Fe Mayor David Coss, State Sen. Jacob Candelaria, (D-Bernalillo), New Mexico’s first Poet Laureate Hakim Bellamy and others.
    In this legislative session, AFT NM hopes to accomplish several goals, including getting the New Mexico Public Education Department to be more receptive to public input, supply more funding to critical programs, let teachers have more say in their evaluations and not rely so much on testing as a barometer of teacher performance and student learning.

  • 'Keep the Promise' keeps at it

    Participants in the “Keep the Promise Bus Tour” met up at the National Education Association offices in Santa Fe Monday to assess how it went, and what impact it had on their mission to reform some key policies concerning student testing, wage structure, teacher evaluation as well as other issues.
    Leading the discussion was the president of the American Federation of Teachers New Mexico, Stephanie Ly. Other participants included Ellen Mills, president of the Los Alamos Federation of School Employees; Karyl Ann Armbruster, a retired teacher from Los Alamos; Isidoro Herrera, also of AFT NM; Charles Goodmacher, UniServ Director, Government Relations, National Education Association, New Mexico; Jared Ames of Working America and Ian Esquibel, executive director of Learning Alliance.
    “Keep the Promise For New Mexico’s future” calls itself a group of “concerned citizens, businesses and organizations who are committed to ensuring a quality education from birth to career for our children, students and our future,” according to a statement on their website.
    The bus tour was to gather input from citizens across New Mexico as to what they wanted to see changed or improved when it came to New Mexico’s public education system.

  • School officials meet with PED

    A meeting between school officials and officials from the New Mexico Public Education Department apparently went well, according to those who attended the meeting.
    Los Alamos school officials that attended the meeting included Superintendent of Schools Dr. Gene Schmidt, Director of Curriculum and Instruction Pamela Miller, School Board President Jim Hall, and School Board Vice President Judy Bjarke-McKenzie.
    The meeting took place in early January. School officials requested the meeting, The purpose was to gain concessions from the NMPED regarding the state’s teacher evaluation process and the state’s version of the end-of-course exams.
    According to Hall, the district accomplished three goals at the meeting.
    “We received a lot more clarification on where they are more flexible,” Hall said, adding that his impression was the PED itself has become more flexible because of all the feedback from Los Alamos and other districts about the issue. Another reason he said was the PED has found it just doesn’t have the staff to accomplish all it set out to do.

  • School officials meet with PED

    A meeting between school officials and officials from the New Mexico Public Education Department apparently went well, according to those who attended the meeting.
    Los Alamos school officials that attended the meeting included Superintendent of Schools Dr. Gene Schmidt, Director of Curriculum and Instruction Pamela Miller, School Board President Jim Hall, and School Board Vice President Judy Bjarke-McKenzie.
    The meeting took place in early January. School officials requested the meeting, The purpose was to gain concessions from the NMPED regarding the state’s teacher evaluation process and the state’s version of the end-of-course exams.
    According to Hall, the district accomplished three goals at the meeting.
    “We received a lot more clarification on where they are more flexible,” Hall said, adding that his impression was the PED itself has become more flexible because of all the feedback from Los Alamos and other districts about the issue. Another reason he said was the PED has found it just doesn’t have the staff to accomplish all it set out to do.

  • Ice cream social
  • American Federation of Teachers-NM keeps heat on NMPED

    An organization aligning itself with New Mexico’s education reform movement recently made its move on the New Mexico Public Education Department, dropping off two petitions with it collected on a recent bus tour of New Mexico.
    One of those petitions, created by Stephanie Ly, president of the American Federation of Teachers New Mexico, had 3,000 signatures.
    Ly personally dropped off the petition with Hanna Skandera, New Mexico’s education secretary in mid-December at New Mexico’s Public Education Office in Santa Fe.
    The petition, which can be found on Move.org, is asking residents to help reform New Mexico’s public education system.
    “We want curriculum that focuses on teaching and learning, not testing, and that includes art, music and the sciences. We want to put the public back in public education,” a statement in the petition read. “The top-down policies of the last decade have not worked. It’s clear that austerity, competition, division and hyper-testing have not and will not help our students. Top-down edicts, sanctions, mass school closures and denigrating teachers will not move the needle in the right direction. Our children and our schools deserve better.”

  • Top Education Stories Of 2013

    The Los Alamos Monitor looks at the top education stories of 2013 in no particular order.

    Paula Dean retires
    With “great reluctance,” Superintendent of Schools Dr. Gene Schmidt accepted Assistant Superintendent of Schools Paula Dean’s retirement this year.
    Schmidt credited her for actively promoting academic achievement for the district’s students and professional development among the teachers and staff. Schmidt also credited her with playing a leading role in helping the Los Alamos Public School District achieve district wide accreditation.
    She was replaced by Gerry Washburn.

    School bond passes 4,283 to 1,784
    County Clerk Sharon Stover congratulates Superintendent of Schools Dr. Gene Schmidt in her offices Tuesday. Los Alamos voted 4283 to 1784 in favor of the bond. The vote gives the school board and the district permission to spend $20 million in bond funds to improve the infrastructure of the school district.
    The money will allow continued construction and renovation to go on at the Los Alamos Middle School as well as allow planned renovations and construction take place at Aspen Elementary over the next five years.

  • Summer school may return for elementary school students

    If all goes well, the holiday spirit may pay off in dividends this summer for elementary school students needing to improve their grade point average.
    Los Alamos teacher Suzanne Lynne, as well as District Curriculum Coordinator Pam Miller have been working hard to bring back summer school for elementary school students this summer. All they are waiting on now is the Los Alamos School Board’s final approval, which they may receive as early as January.
    Their plan is charge a tuition of $100 per student per subject for the month-long session, which will consist of hour and a half classes in math and reading, five days a week.
    According to Miller, summer school for elementary school students has not always been able to happen, in fact it didn’t even happen at all last year. In the years that it did, tuition has been as high as $175, as well as free, but both fee structures presented the same problem, low attendance.
    If it was too expensive, people simply didn’t sign up and if it was free, then people didn’t place a high priority on attendance Miller and Lynne said at the meeting.
    There’s a reason why the School Board is interested in summer school at this early date. If the program is approved, school officials can start identifying students now who may need the extra help this year.