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Education

  • NM Senate OKs bill to give schools A-to-F grades

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — A proposal by Republican Gov. Susana Martinez to assign grades from A to F to rate New Mexico's public schools cleared the Senate on Wednesday.

    Supporters said the grades will provide better information to parents about the quality of their local schools.

  • Surveys to guide LAPS cuts

    Belt-tightening and budgeting is becoming commonplace in light of the country’s economic situation. Families and individuals are feeling the pinch, as are state and school entities.
    For the past several months, the Los Alamos Public Schools Long Range Financial Planning Committee worked on putting together a series of surveys that allowed LAPS stakeholders to have input on the budget process. The survey closed on March 6 and now the planning committee will begin compiling information to be shared with the public during a school board meeting in April.

  • Board to raise tuition rates at UNM-LA

    The price of gas is on the rise, grocery prices are also going up and soon, the price of tuition at the University of New Mexico-Los Alamos also will be increased, thanks to House Bill 2, currently making its way through the Senate.

  • L.A. Teen Center Opens

    The L.A. Teen Center opened Monday at lunchtime for youth in 9th to 12th grade. The center is across from Los Alamos High School in the lower level of Trinity on the Hill Church.

    The Family YMCA is operating the new facility, which will have its official grand opening for the community in a couple of weeks.

    In the meantime, teens can participate in the many activities available at the center including computers with high-speed wireless Internet, Wii video games, PS3 PlayStation, ping pong, air hockey, study area, pool table, television and more.

  • Skandera defends education qualifications

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Public Education Secretary-Designate Hanna Skandera is defending her experience in the education field after facing questions over whether she meets constitutional requirements for the job.

    The New Mexico Constitution states that the leader of the Public Education Department must be a "qualified, experienced educator."

  • Education head faces questions

    SANTA FE — Republican Gov. Susana Martinez’s nominee for public education secretary, Hanna Skandera, faces questions in the Legislature over whether she meets constitutional requirements for the job.
    The leader of the Public Education Department must be a “qualified, experienced educator,” according to the New Mexico Constitution, but Skandera has never worked as a teacher or administrator in a public elementary or secondary school.

  • Skandera's qualifications questioned

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — Questions are being raised in the Legislature over whether Gov. Susana Martinez's nominee for public education secretary meets state constitutional requirements for the job.

    The constitution says the leader of the Public Education Department must be a "qualified, experienced educator." But Public Education Secretary Hanna Skandera has never worked as a teacher or administrator in an elementary or secondary school.

  • Martinez targets social promotion of students

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — Republican Gov. Susana Martinez and a bipartisan group of lawmakers want to stop promoting public school students to the next grade if they lack required basic skills.

    Martinez joined Republican and Democratic lawmakers at a news conference on Thursday in support of legislation to halt the practice of "social promotion."

  • Pa. teacher strikes nerve with 'lazy whiners' blog

    FEASTERVILLE, Pa. (AP) — A high school English teacher in suburban Philadelphia who was suspended for a profanity-laced blog in which she called her young charges "disengaged, lazy whiners" is driving a sensation by daring to ask: Why are today's students unmotivated — and what's wrong with calling them out?

  • House panel OKs public school budget bill

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — State spending on public schools would be cut by more than 1 percent next year under a budget proposal approved by a House committee Monday.

    The House Education Committee recommended spending nearly $2.4 billion on schools, the Public Education Department and education programs such as pre-kindergarten in the fiscal year that starts in July. That's about $30 million, or 1.2 percent, less than this year's spending on public education.