.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Education

  • District hikes rent on instruments

    For all those aspiring musicians out there in the Los Alamos Public Schools system, the school board has some good news and some bad news.

    The bad news is, it recently voted to raise the rental fees for school instruments by $20, making the price $100 to rent an instrument from the district per school year and $50 for the summer. Percussionists, who never had to pay a rental fee, will now have to pay $20 a year for the privilege.

    The good news is the rental rates haven’t been raised since the 80s, and the $20 hike should be more than adequate to take care of repairs for quite a while.

    “We decided on $20 because it was a nice round number that would be adequate for repair and maintenance of the instruments,” said Kim Lettellier, the school system’s music staff team leader. “This should prevent us from having to nickel and dime parents every year.”

    During an interview with the school board, Lettellier also noted that $100 a year is still quite a bargain.

    “To rent a violin some place else, it would cost students about $15 a month. That’s a basic fee, anywhere you go,” she said. “ … It is quite a service we are providing to the community.”

  • Freshman orientation

    Freshmen were at Los Alamos High School Tuesday for orientation. LAHS ambassadors took students on tours highlighting access points for the new students

  • Last-minute moves cause concerns

    For many parents that have kids attending the middle school this year, it was worry enough knowing their kids were going to be getting an education in a virtual construction zone as the middle school undergoes a multi-million dollar, year-long renovation.

    As the summer wore on and the first day of school loomed closer and closer, worry turned to frustration as the portable classrooms meant for the middle school students just sat in a lot outside Los Alamos High School, with no plans to move them in sight.

    Add to that the decision to move the portable classrooms was delayed by two more weeks due to a complaint from one of the project’s losing bidders. The uncertainty and delays brought many parents to their breaking point.

    Even School Board President Kevin Honnell was frustrated.

    “There was a lot of concern about this. I had to watch, like the rest of the residents driving back and forth on Diamond Drive, the calendar days peel by with nothing being done,” Honnell said.

    But at Tuesday’s  Los Alamos Public Schools Board of Education meeting, he and others finally got their answers from McCarthy spokesman David Wharram.

  • First day of school

    Wednesday marked the first day of school for Los Alamos Public School students.

  • And the walls come tumbling down ...

    Demolition began this week at the Los Alamos Middle School. Portables have been moved from the high school and classes will start Aug. 15.

  • Teachers Want Reform

    Teachers, parents and administrators say they’d welcome a reform of New Mexico’s teacher evaluation system.

    But they say the current rule has been rushed and doesn’t account for challenges outside the classroom.

    The state chapter of the American Federation of Teachers led a protest Wednesday before education officials met in a public hearing. The Greater Albuquerque Chamber of Commerce is among supporters of the new rule.

    Efforts to replace the current evaluation system with one based on student test score gains failed in the Legislature.
    Education Secretary Hanna Skandera then moved to overhaul the system through administrative rule.

  • UNM-LA to offer programs for younger students

    UNM-LA will host “University Experience,” from July 23-27. This program is a newly designed and invigorated version of what was once called “Children’s College.”  
    This program includes two components, the “University Adventures” program for students entering grades 4-7 and “University Explorations” for older students entering grades 7-12.  Seventh graders may select either program, depending on their interests.

  • Board green lights bus loop

    Months of debate, rejected plans and much discussion came to an end Tuesday during the Los Alamos Board of Education meeting.

    Board members were able to reach a consensus regarding the proposed bus loop at Los Alamos High School and voted 5-0 in favor of study number eight, which would have buses entering school grounds from Diamond Drive and exiting onto Orange Street.

    According to a press release from Los Alamos Public Schools, the High School Bus Loop Committee met on July 3 “to review the high school bus loop option that will be presented to the school board at the July 10 meeting.

  • Bus loop plan moves forward

    At Tuesday’s meeting, school board members voted 5-0 to push forward with a plan for a bus loop at Los Alamos High School. They also voted 4-1, to allocate funds for landscaping the project. LAPS Board Member Melanie McKinley voted against the landscaping motion. The board action has cleared the way for construction of the bus loop to begin. Read the full story in Thursday’s Los Alamos Monitor.

  • DPU-PEEC program reaches out to LA schools

    Did you know you can create a “battery” using the malic acid in an apple? Or that light can make things move? Students in the Los Alamos Public Schools are experimenting with these and other hands on projects through outreach programs sponsored by the Department of Public Utilities and implemented by the Pajarito Environmental Educational Center.

    DPU initiated the program after the New Mexico Office of the State Engineer mandated outreach to the public schools and the general public as part of a resolution regarding water rights compliance issues. DPU has $20,000 budgeted for the program, and has contracted with PEEC for the last three years to provide the service.