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Courts

  • NM Wiccan follower gets 20 years for killing

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — An Albuquerque woman who pleaded no contest to fatally stabbing a man with a dagger she planned to use as part of a Wiccan ritual was sentenced to 20 years in prison Friday.

    Angela Sanford, 31, received the maximum sentence at a hearing in Albuquerque District Court.

    Sanford stabbed Joel Leyva, 52, more than a dozen times in the head, neck and stomach with a dagger used in Wiccan rituals called an athame, authorities said. It happened in early 2010 near a popular hiking trail on the eastern edge of Albuquerque.

  • On the Docket 11-30-11

    Nov. 17

    Louann Cordova, 42, of Penasco pleaded no contest in Municipal Court to the charges of speeding 16-20 mph over the posted limit, two counts of failure to appear and two counts of failure to appear on order to show cause. Judge Alan Kirk ordered Cordova to pay  $413 in fines and fees.

    Roberto Martinez, 47, of Santa Fe pleaded guilty in Municipal Court to the charges of speeding 1-5 mph over the posted limit, failure to appear, failure to pay fines and failure to appear on order to show cause. Judge Alan Kirk ordered Martinez to pay  $449 in fines and fees.
    Nov. 23

  • Court to hear appeal of nuke lab suit

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — A federal appeals court has agreed to consider a watchdog group's lawsuit to halt construction of a new $6 billion plutonium lab at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    The 10th Circuit Court of Appeals in Denver Tuesday agreed to consider the merits of the appeal by the Los Alamos Study Group. The group filed a lawsuit last year to halt development of the so-called Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Replacement nuclear facility. The group alleged the Department of Energy and the National Nuclear Security Administration violated federal law by failing to do a new environmental impact statement after changing the design for project to address seismic and other safety concerns

  • Charges dropped against Vigils

    State District Judge Michael Vigil has ruled that prosecutors lacked evidence to pursue abuse charges against Katrina Vigil and her parents in the September 2010 death of Grey Vigil.

    Judge Vigil said Wednesday in a Santa Fe courtroom that there is no probable cause to charge Katrina Vigil, 25, with abuse or neglect in the death of her newborn son who lived just 11 days after being born in her parents’ Los Alamos home.

  • On The Docket 11-23-11

    Nov. 14

    Cheryl Gabaldon, 47, of Los Alamos pleaded guilty in Magistrate Court to the charges of possession of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia. Judge Pat Casados ordered Gabaldon to pay the court a $50 fee for possession of marijuana and a $50 fee for possession of drug paraphernalia, $20 in court costs and $256 in additional fees.

    Nov. 15

  • District judge to hear cases locally

    Every Wednesday morning beginning in January, local residents will conduct their District Court obligations at the Justice Center in downtown Los Alamos – saving litigants, jurors, police, attorneys, witnesses, family members and friends alike the commute to Santa Fe.   

    “It’s about time,” said District Court Judge Sheri Raphaelson as Magistrate Court Judge Pat Casados gave her and her staff a tour of the Justice Center Wednesday.

    Casados explained that many years ago a District Court judge did travel to hear cases occasionally in Los Alamos, adding that she’s not sure why that practice ended.

  • Supreme Court: Pre-election health care showdown--video extra

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Monday promised an extraordinarily thorough springtime review of President Barack Obama's historic health care overhaul — more than five hours of argument, unprecedented in modern times — in time for a likely ruling affecting millions of Americans just before the presidential election.

    That ruling, expected before next summer's Independence Day holiday, could determine the fate of Obama's signature domestic achievement, the most far reaching domestic legislation in a generation but a political lightning rod as well. It is vigorously opposed by all of Obama's prospective GOP opponents.

  • On the Docket 11-09-11

    Nov. 2

    Kathy Steck, 53, of Los Alamos pleaded guilty in Magistrate Court to the charge of driving under the influence of intoxicating liquor or drugs. Judge Pat Casados sentenced Steck to serve 364 days of supervised probation,  and to participate in alcohol screening and treatment, attend DWI school and a victim’s impact panel, install an interlock device on her vehicle and perform 24 hours of supervised community service. The judge also ordered Steck to pay $25 per month probation fee, $20 in court costs and $221 in court fees.

    Nov. 3

  • Jackson doctor convicted in star's 2009 drug death--video extra

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — A jury has convicted Michael Jackson's doctor of involuntary manslaughter in the singer's 2009 drug death.

    The jury reached its verdict Monday after deliberating less than nine hours. Prosecutors depicted Dr. Conrad Murray as a reckless physician who abandoned Jackson while he was under the effects of the powerful anesthetic propofol.

    Attorneys for the Houston-based cardiologist countered that Jackson was addicted to the drug and self-administered the fatal dose when Murray left his bedroom.

    Murray agreed to become Jackson's personal physician as the singer prepared for a series of comeback concerts in 2009.

  • On the Docket 11-02-11

    Oct. 19

    Michael Fowler, 33, of Española pleaded guilty in Magistrate Court to the charge of driving under the influence of intoxicating liquor or drugs. Judge Pat Casados sentenced Fowler to participate in an alcohol screening and treatment program, continue attending prevention meetings three times a week, install an interlock device on his vehicle, attend DWI school and a victim impact panel, serve 364 days of supervised probation and 24 hours of supervised community service. The judge also ordered Fowler to pay a $50 fee for possessing a controlled substance, $20 in court costs and $291 in fees.