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Courts

  • On The Docket 01-11-12

    Dec. 13

    Sarah Scammell Downs, 30, of Los Alamos pled guilty in Los Alamos Magistrate Court to the charge of DWI. Judge Pat Casados sentenced Downs to serve 364 days of supervised probation, and to pay $241 in court fees. Downs also was ordered to install an inter-lock device on her vehicle.

    Dec. 14

    Tyler Jones, 26, of Los Alamos pled not guilty in Los Alamos Magistrate Court to the charges of battery and criminal damage to property. Judge Pat Casados found Jones guilty and sentenced him to serve 180 days of supervised probation and to pay $146 in court fees.

    Dec. 21

  • LA to remain whole in state House redistricting court decision

    SANTA FE, N.M.— A state district judge has approved a plan for drawing new boundaries of state House of Representative districts that will pair two Republican incumbents in southeastern Mexico and two Democrats in the north-central part of the state.

    District Judge James Hall issued his redistricting order Tuesday.

    Rep. Jim Hall (R-Los Alamos, Santa Fe, Sandoval) said he received a text from a member of the Republican caucus Tuesday night saying the judge had adopted Executive Plan 3 "with a couple of changes."

  • Court approves NM congressional redistricting plan

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — A state district judge has adopted a redistricting plan that will establish slightly different boundaries for New Mexico's three congressional districts.

    Judge James Hall issued his ruling Thursday afternoon.

    Hall is adopting a plan that makes the fewest changes to the existing districts. It has the support of Gov. Susana Martinez, other Republicans and a group of Democrats that include Rep. Brian Egolf of Santa Fe.

    Hall contends the plan respects existing boundaries and places the fewest number of voters in new districts.

    He says it also strikes an appropriate balance between various interests and political parties.

  • Trial starts on NM congressional redistricting

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — A trial began Monday that will influence the political tilt of New Mexico's three congressional districts for the rest of the decade.

    State District Judge James Hall is presiding over the trial, which is expected to last several days this week. Democrats currently hold two of the state's congressional seats. Groups of Republicans, Democrats and minority voters are recommending options to the judge to consider in drawing new district boundaries.

    GOP Gov. Susana Martinez, other Republicans and some Democrats, including Rep. Brian Egolf of Santa Fe, support a "least change" plan making few revisions to current districts.

  • NM Wiccan follower gets 20 years for killing

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — An Albuquerque woman who pleaded no contest to fatally stabbing a man with a dagger she planned to use as part of a Wiccan ritual was sentenced to 20 years in prison Friday.

    Angela Sanford, 31, received the maximum sentence at a hearing in Albuquerque District Court.

    Sanford stabbed Joel Leyva, 52, more than a dozen times in the head, neck and stomach with a dagger used in Wiccan rituals called an athame, authorities said. It happened in early 2010 near a popular hiking trail on the eastern edge of Albuquerque.

  • On the Docket 11-30-11

    Nov. 17

    Louann Cordova, 42, of Penasco pleaded no contest in Municipal Court to the charges of speeding 16-20 mph over the posted limit, two counts of failure to appear and two counts of failure to appear on order to show cause. Judge Alan Kirk ordered Cordova to pay  $413 in fines and fees.

    Roberto Martinez, 47, of Santa Fe pleaded guilty in Municipal Court to the charges of speeding 1-5 mph over the posted limit, failure to appear, failure to pay fines and failure to appear on order to show cause. Judge Alan Kirk ordered Martinez to pay  $449 in fines and fees.
    Nov. 23

  • Court to hear appeal of nuke lab suit

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — A federal appeals court has agreed to consider a watchdog group's lawsuit to halt construction of a new $6 billion plutonium lab at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    The 10th Circuit Court of Appeals in Denver Tuesday agreed to consider the merits of the appeal by the Los Alamos Study Group. The group filed a lawsuit last year to halt development of the so-called Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Replacement nuclear facility. The group alleged the Department of Energy and the National Nuclear Security Administration violated federal law by failing to do a new environmental impact statement after changing the design for project to address seismic and other safety concerns

  • Charges dropped against Vigils

    State District Judge Michael Vigil has ruled that prosecutors lacked evidence to pursue abuse charges against Katrina Vigil and her parents in the September 2010 death of Grey Vigil.

    Judge Vigil said Wednesday in a Santa Fe courtroom that there is no probable cause to charge Katrina Vigil, 25, with abuse or neglect in the death of her newborn son who lived just 11 days after being born in her parents’ Los Alamos home.

  • On The Docket 11-23-11

    Nov. 14

    Cheryl Gabaldon, 47, of Los Alamos pleaded guilty in Magistrate Court to the charges of possession of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia. Judge Pat Casados ordered Gabaldon to pay the court a $50 fee for possession of marijuana and a $50 fee for possession of drug paraphernalia, $20 in court costs and $256 in additional fees.

    Nov. 15

  • District judge to hear cases locally

    Every Wednesday morning beginning in January, local residents will conduct their District Court obligations at the Justice Center in downtown Los Alamos – saving litigants, jurors, police, attorneys, witnesses, family members and friends alike the commute to Santa Fe.   

    “It’s about time,” said District Court Judge Sheri Raphaelson as Magistrate Court Judge Pat Casados gave her and her staff a tour of the Justice Center Wednesday.

    Casados explained that many years ago a District Court judge did travel to hear cases occasionally in Los Alamos, adding that she’s not sure why that practice ended.