.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Courts

  • On The Docket 3-4-15

    March 2

    Brock A. Koehler was found guilty by the Los Alamos Magistrate Court of assault.
    The defendant is to serve 180 days at the Los Alamos County Detention Center, all suspended. Defendant must also undergo 180 days of supervised probation and pay $73 in court costs.
    Probation conditions include: Defendant will obey all laws and not be arrested, indicted, charged or convicted of any other offense. Defendant will comply with all court ordered conditions of probation. Defendant shall not possess or consume alcohol or enter a liquor establishment and commit to paying $25 a month probation fees to the Los Alamos Municipal Court. Defendant shall not possess a firearm, destructive device or weapon.
    Defendant will meet with probation officers within seven days and maintain contact as instructed.

    March 3

  • On The Docket 2-26-15

    Feb. 17

    Kenneth G. Hagedorn was found guilty by the Los Alamos Magistrate Court of attempting to commit aggravated assault with a deadly weapon. The original charge was aggravated assault with a deadly weapon.
    Defendant is to serve at the Los Alamos Detention Center for 364 days, all suspended. He was also given supervised probation for 364 days and ordered to pay $73 in court costs.
    Defendant shall obey all federal, state and local laws. Defendant will comply with all conditions of probation. The defendant shall not enter an establishment that buys or sells alcohol. Defendant shall not possess a firearm, destructive device or weapon. Defendant will also meet with a probation officer within seven days and maintain contact as instructed.
    Defendant shall also pay $25 per month probation fees. Payments are to be made to the Los Alamos Municipal Court.
    If after three months there are no violations, defendant may be released early from probation.

    Feb. 20

    Ron Morgan was found guilty by the Los Alamos Municipal Court of speeding 11 to 15 miles an hour over the speed limit. Defendant was fined $75 and ordered to pay $65 in court costs.

    Feb. 23

  • Former LA grad named new judge

    Los Alamos native and 1996 Los Alamos High School graduate Jennifer Attrep, 37, was appointed by Gov. Susana Martinez Monday evening to be Los Alamos’ next First Judicial District Judge.
    Attrep will replace former Judge Sheri Raphaelson, who stepped down at the end of last year after voters decided not to retain her for another term.
    This will not be the first time Attrep, who now lives in Santa Fe, has served the First Judicial Court as a judge. In July 2014, she was appointed by Martinez to fill out another judge’s term until the end of the year.
    When contacted Monday night by the Los Alamos Monitor, Attrep said she was thrilled with the news that she will be returning once again.
    “I’m so honored to get the appointment from Gov. Martinez,” Attrep said. “I’m really grateful to have the opportunity to return the bench and serve the counties of Los Alamos, Rio Arriba and Santa Fe once again.”

  • On The Docket 2-18-15

    Feb. 10
    Richie Burrell was found guilty by the Los Alamos Magistrate Court of tampering with evidence (Highest crime a misdemeanor or petty misdemeanor). The original charge was tampering with evidence (Highest crime a third, fourth or indeterminate degree felony.
    Defendant was sentenced to 180 days in county jail with 180 days suspended and supervised probation for 180 days. Defendant was also ordered to pay $73 in court costs.
    Probation conditions include:
    Defendant shall obey all federal, state and local laws. Defendant will comply with all conditions of probation. The defendant shall not enter an establishment that buys or sells alcohol. Defendant shall into possess a firearm, destructive device or weapon.
    Defendant will also meet with a probation officer within seven days and maintain contact as instructed. Defendant shall also pay $25 per month probation fees. Payments are to be made to the Los Alamos Municipal Court. Probation will start on this case when probation is over on other case. Probation will start on May 23.

  • Stalker gets suspended sentence

    Los Alamos resident Paul Kubler, who was arrested twice in January for stalking another Los Alamos resident, as well as other charges, was sentenced to probation Tuesday in court.
    According to court records, within one week in late January, Kubler was arrested twice for stalking, driving while under the influence of liquor and/or drugs and giving false evidence of vehicle title and registration.
    In court, Kubler pled guilty to stalking, misdemeanor telephone harassment (reduced down from aggravated stalking) and driving while intoxicated, first offense.
    The stalking charges came from when Kubler waited for his victim in a nearby parking lot to get out of work at a business on Diamond Drive. When he saw his victim, he tried to drive over to her and wave her down.
    Police said that’s when his victim ran to a nearby business and called police.
    Kubler was also facing a more serious stalking charge when he called her home and told her that her dog had died. He was charged with aggravated stalking in that case, which was reduced down to misdemeanor telephone harassment Tuesday.
    During that arrest, police again told Kubler to stop contacting the victim. Kubler told the officers that the police “couldn’t stop true love, and that love would overcome everything.”

  • Attorney, court argue over who pays for eval

    Determining responsibility over who should pay for a psychological evaluation seems to be the main hold up to a Los Alamos man being sentenced for his crimes.
    In May 2014, Stephen Geisik of Los Alamos was found guilty of on two counts of criminal contact with a child under the age of 18 and count of contributing to the delinquency of a minor.
    However, after the trial, Judge Mary Marlowe Sommer requested a psychological evaluation of the defendant. In November, the court ruled that the evaluation, which was arranged by Geisik’s defense attorney, Sydney West and paid for through the public defender’s office, was not comprehensive enough.
    Another evaluation was ordered in December and that time, Judge Sommer ordered that the District Attorney’s Office pay for it.
    Assistant District Attorney Kent Wahlquist filed a motion in January disputing the order, citing a 1987 New Mexico Supreme Court order that states the agency that asks for an expert witness to testify shall be responsible for the fees.
    In this case, that agency is the First Judicial District Court. Wahlquist further clarified his point in his January motion.

  • On The Docket 2-5-15

    Jan. 29

    Paul J. Martinez was found guilty by the Los Alamos Municipal Court of speeding in a school zone six to 10 miles an hour over the speed limit and failing to pay. Defendant was fined $55 and ordered to pay $130 in court costs.

    Deborah J. Barnes was found guilty by the Los Alamos Municipal Court of failing to yield or stop at a sign and failing to pay court costs and/or fines. Defendant was fined $75 and ordered to pay $130 in court costs.

    Sandra L. Keller was found guilty by the Los Alamos Municipal Court of failing to obey a traffic signal. Sentence was deferred until March 29. Other sentence was defensive driving school. Defendant was ordered to pay $65 in court costs.

    Barbara M. Forslund was found guilty by the Los Alamos Municipal Court of failing to yield or stop at a sign. Defendant was fined $50 and ordered to pay $46 in court costs.

    Feb. 2

    Anita K. Archuleta pled no contest in the Los Alamos Municipal Court of contempt of court/pxrobation violation as well as found guilty of failing to appear in court. Defendant was fined $75 and ordered to pay $225 in court costs.

  • On The Docket 1-29-15

    Jan. 22

    Jesus A. Bajarano-Dominguez was found guilty by the Los Alamos Municipal Court of speeding 11 to 15 miles an hour over the speed limit. Defendant was fined $75 and ordered to pay $65 in court costs.

    Travis W. Brown was found guilty by the Los Alamos Municipal Court of failing to display a current, valid registration plate. Defendant was fined $60 and ordered to pay $65 in court costs.

    Jan. 23

    Zachary Garcia was found guilty by the Los Alamos Municipal Court of stopping, standing or parking in a restricted or prohibited space on certain streets. Defendant was fined $50.

    Jan. 25

    Victoria R. Garrett was found guilty by the Los Alamos Municipal Court of speeding 11 to 15 miles an hour over the speed limit. Defendant was fined $75 and ordered to pay $65 in court costs.

    Jan. 26

    Phillip McFerrin was found guilty by the Los Alamos Magistrate Court of battery. The case was dismissed because a witness failed to appear.

    Brianna M. Garcia was found guilty by the Los Alamos Municipal Court of speeding six to 10 miles an hour over the speed limit. Defendant was fined $50 and ordered to pay $65 in court costs.

  • Vigil case goes to district court

    Brandi Vigil, the Alcade woman accused of trying to cash $3,555.07 in checks she stole out the mailboxes of Los Alamos residents in 2013, will be heading from magistrate court to district court.
    However, her attorney, Tyr Loranger, almost derailed those plans, entering a motion centering on right to speedy trial laws.
    “My client informed me that she was picked up on a warrant on the 11th of September. Her release order was filed on or about Dec. 10, but she was not released until Dec. 24 of 2014. This is approximately three and a half months.” He then quoted a statute to Los Alamos Magistrate Court Judge Pat Casados that emphasized a suspect in a crime cannot be held more than 10 days before their preliminary hearing if they’re in custody and no more than 60 days if they aren’t in custody.
    “In this case, Ms. Vigil was in custody, and so the state was well outside its time limits,” he said.
    The prosecution however argued that Vigil was held without prejudice, so the limits didn’t apply.
    Tyranger argued that there was nothing to support the prosecution’s claims.
    “There was not good cause established by the state,” he said. “...The exception is very clear. No preliminary hearing shall be heard after the time limits have lapsed.”

  • Judge candidates have ties to LA

    The University of New Mexico School of Law’s First Judicial Court Nominating Commission announced its list of candidates Tuesday night for the judicial vacancy in New Mexico’s First Judicial District, Division 5.
    The First Judicial District covers the counties of Rio Arriba, Los Alamos and Santa Fe. Sheri Raphaelson, the judge that occupied the Division 5 seat for four years, was voted out in the 2014 election.
    The candidates for the position include, Jennifer L. Attrep, Julia Hosford Barnes, Paul William Grace, Tyr R. Loranger and Christopher Romero. All of them are practicing attorneys.
    At least two of the candidates, Attrep and Loranger, have ties to Los Alamos. Loranger, a private attorney based in Santa Fe, is a regular at the Los Alamos County Justice Center, having defended numerous residents here.
    Attrep, meanwhile, grew up in Los Alamos and is a graduate of Los Alamos High School.
    She is a practicing attorney currently living in Santa Fe. She is the only attorney on the list that has experience serving as a district judge, having served a few months in 2014 in the First Judicial District.