.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Business/Economy

  • Mailing a letter will cost another penny next year

    WASHINGTON (AP) — It'll cost another penny to mail a letter next year.

    The cash-strapped U.S. Postal Service said Thursday that it will raise postage rates on Jan. 27, including a 1-cent increase in the cost of first-class mail to 46 cents.

    It also will introduce a new global "forever" stamp, allowing customers to mail first-class letters anywhere in the world for one set price of $1.10. Currently, the prices vary depending on the international destination, with letters to Canada and Mexico costing 85 cents.

    Under the law, the post office cannot raise stamp prices more than the rate of inflation, or 2.6 percent, unless it gets special permission. The post office, which expects to lose a record $15 billion this year, has asked Congress to give it new authority to raise prices by 5 cents, but lawmakers have failed to act.

    The mail agency also will increase rates on its shipping services, such as priority mail, by an average of 4 percent.

  • Doggy Daycare opens

    Rover I Doggy Day Care opened its doors last week at 212 DP Road, under the ownership of Trish Lind.

     

  • Tech company opens

    Brian Kelley, holding his daughter Athena, officially cut the ribbon on Azazo Technologies, “a computer company that can fix any computer or network problem, large or small.” The company also will be selling used computer equipment. Call 672-5105 for more information.
    Helping Kelley open his new business are, left to right, Kevin Holsapple, executive director of the Los Alamos Commerce and Development Corporation, employee Heather Eichwald, Katy Korkos, member services coordinator at the Commerce and Development Corporation and business advisor Katie Staver.
    Azazo is located at 1907 Central Ave., Suite 207. The email is thepandagiant@live.com.

  • Pumps open at Smith's Fuel Station

    Smiths Fuel Station on Trinity Drive was open for business this morning and store officials and employees were out for the ribbon cutting ceremony. Store hours are 6 a.m. to 11 p.m. and pumps are open for 24 hours if paid by credit card.

  • Smith’s Fuel Station to open Wednesday

    Smith’s Food and Drug Stores is opening its 19th Smith’s Express fuel station in New Mexico at 1239 Trinity Dr. at 8 a.m. Wednesday, following a ribbon cutting hosted by Smith’s representatives and Katy Korkos, Los Alamos Chamber of Commerce Member Services coordinator.
    The station is comprised of 10 filling nozzles, courtesy air hose, a convenience-item case for snacks, and a 10-foot by 20-foot kiosk for the fuel attendant. Smith’s is planning to build a new Smith’s Marketplace store across the street that is expected to open in early 2014.
    “We are pleased to now offer our Los Alamos and White Rock customers fuel savings at our Smith’s Express,” said John Roberts, Smith’s Los Alamos store director.  “In fact, rewards points maybe redeemed to save up to $2 per gallon through the remainder of the year.”

  • ‘County Line’ remains online

    The Los Alamos County council weighed the cost/benefits of reinstituting a monthly mailing of the “County Line” newsletter to every household and voted 5-1 against the idea.

    The cost to re-institute the print newsletter is estimated to be $48,000 per year and rising as postal rates continue to escalate.

    Public Information Officer Julie Habiger will instead increase efforts to have citizens subscribe to the weekly online newsletter and work with local organizations to reach those who lack computer access.

    The debate centered around the issues of an informed public versus cost and demands on staff time.  

    Council first debated whether to finance an extension of the printed newsletter during budget hearings in April. The project had been funded for two years to establish it within the community, with the original intention of moving to an online-only version.

    Council voted not to include the newsletter in the FY 13 budget, but asked for a re-evaluation of the online “County Line” in six months.

    Rental agreements for specialized equipment to apply address labels and labeling software expired in March and the equipment was returned. No space was allotted in the new Municipal Building’s media services space for the 8-foot-by-3-foot piece of equipment.

  • Romney barrels out of first debate on offense

    DENVER (AP) — Little more than a month from Election Day, Republican Mitt Romney is barreling out of the first presidential debate energized by a solid performance that telegraphed his determination to take it to President Barack Obama with gusto. The president, intent on keeping his momentum from stalling, is warning Americans that his GOP rival's policy prescriptions for a fragile economy are more fantasy than reality.

    Standing toe-to-toe with the president for the first time in the campaign, Romney held his own and more at a time when there already were signs that the race is tightening in some of the battleground states where Obama has enjoyed an advantage. Obama kept his cool and signaled that he won't let up on his message that Romney's plans on taxes, health care, the deficit and more just don't add up.

    "It's fun," Romney declared well into Wednesday night's 90-minute faceoff, clearly relishing the back-and-forth.

  • Fall events set for Saturday

    Bandelier National Monument and Pajarito Mountain Ski Area are both hosting events Saturday.

    After a year’s hiatus due to the Las Conchas fire, Bandelier National Monument’s Fall Fiesta is back with both new and familiar activities for the whole family. This year’s theme is “Celebrating Nature through Art and Culture.”

    “We’re looking at really tying together the Native cultural aspects with the Spanish cultural aspects of the region and to do concerted outreach and to make this sort of the destination event for that outreach,” Public Information Officer Rod Torrez said. “We will also include the natural history of the park as part of it as well. I think hopefully we’ll have something that covers a wide range of Bandelier’s history.”

    The event will include Pueblo and Hispanic cultural demonstrations, games, traditional dancing and arts at the park. Artist demonstrations will include tinwork and pottery. Gary Roybal demonstrates moccasin making while his son, also Gary, exhibits his turkey calls. Turkeys played a big part in Bandelier’s history.

    Friends of Bandelier and representatives from Valles Caldera National Monument will focus on the park’s natural history, and a group with rescued raptors will be on hand.

  • White Rock tops list of NM suburbs

    Suburbia has grown to be an important piece in the fabric of America, offering more space (and a lot more peace and quiet) for people who would rather enjoy a backyard barbecue and soccer games as opposed to the hustle and bustle of city life.

    In its five-part “Best Places to Live” series, Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC partnered with Onboard Informatics to rank the top places for suburbanites and analyze trends based on data from more than 11,000 suburban areas across the country.

    The real estate firm released its new report, the “Best Places to Live for Suburbanites,” which ranks White Rock No. 16 out of 11,000 suburbs in the United States. In the state of New Mexico, it topped the list as No. 1.

    The data revealed a glimpse into life in the suburbs, where many people own their homes (75 percent), drive to work (92 percent) and spend approximately four times as much to prepare meals at home rather than go out to eat.

    Cherry Hills Village, Colo., approximately 10 miles south of downtown Denver, ranks as the No. 1 Best Place for suburbanites, receiving the highest score in the nation with a nearly 100 percent home ownership rate and less than 20-minute average commute.

  • Gates: Windows 8 Will Be "A Very Big Deal"