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Los Alamos National Laboratory

  • Last of buildings removed from LANL TA-21

    On Dec. 21, Recovery Act workers finished tearing down the last and largest of the 24 buildings and structures slated for removal with Recovery Act fund­ing at Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Technical Area 21 (TA-21).
    The project is on track to be completed six months ahead of schedule that produced $16 million in savings. TA- 21 housed Manhattan Project and Cold War facilities, many of which were built as long ago as the 1940s.

  • NMED may rethink explosives burn ban

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory had asked New Mexico Environment Secretary Ron Curry to reconsider his ruling on open burning.

    On Dec. 21, Curry did reconsider, according to a LANL spokesperson.

    But at press time, it was uncertain what, if any, change has been made.

    “We’re very appreciative that Secretary Curry granted our motion.  It allows us to continue our research on improvised explosive devices—research that saves lives at home and overseas,” LANL spokesman Fred DeSousa said.  

  • Track Santa Claus on Christmas Eve

    For the 55th consecutive year, millions of people all over the world over will be able to keep tabs on Santa as he treks around the globe delivering presents to good girls and boys. And scientists from Los Alamos National Laboratory are again part of the effort! Los Alamos trackers will use state-of-the-art technology to mark the course taken by Old St. Nick and his reindeer; visit http://santa.lanl.gov beginning at 6 a.m. Dec. 24 to see his journey.

  • LANL has a record cleanup this year

    Los Alamos National Laboratory finished 12 months worth of environmental cleanup by breaking LANL records in several areas as fiscal year 2010 ended.  
    Los Alamos personnel conducted more field investigations and cleanup campaigns than ever and completed a record number of lab shipments to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP).

  • Top Democrat predicts Senate will OK arms treaty

    WASHINGTON (AP) — A top Democrat predicted Monday that the Senate will approve a new arms control treaty with Russia, but conceded that it will take "house by house combat" to collect enough votes from recalcitrant Republicans to prevail.

    The comments by Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., came a day after Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said he would oppose the accord, complicating President Barack Obama's prospects for achieving his top foreign policy priority.

  • Wreaths Across America

    Lawrence Armenta of the Materials Management group at Los Alamos National Laboratory, second from left, Lawrence Jr., wife Claudine and daughter Lauren were part of the more than 300 LANL employees who volunteered to lay wreaths on graves at Santa Fe National Cemetery Saturday.

     

  • LANL takes steps toward energy efficiency

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory is hoping a new energy savings contract project will yield about $28 million over the next 20 years.
    The program, announced by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) this week, would save the lab $1.2 million per year in electrical, heating, ventilating and air conditioning costs. That’s a 3 percent savings on LANL’s annual energy bill.

  • Scientists gain protein factory understanding

    Theoretical biologists at Los Alamos National Laboratory have used a New Mexico supercomputer to aid an international research team in untangling another mystery related to ribosomes – those enigmatic jumbles of molecules that are the protein factories of living cells.

  • NMED renews LANL permit, blocks burning of explosive waste

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico Environment Secretary Ron Curry on Tuesday renewed a permit that allows Los Alamos National Laboratory to manage and store hazardous waste from research, contamination cleanup and other activities at the lab, but open burning of certain waste will be off limits.

    Renewal of the permit has been a long time coming. The northern New Mexico nuclear weapons lab has been operating under its current permit — with some modifications — since 1989.

  • Environmental report shows no adverse impacts

    Environmental monitoring of operations at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in 2009 indicates no adverse impact to public health or the environment from laboratory operations.
    The findings are presented in the Laboratory’s Environmental Report 2009.
    The annual report demonstrates LLNL’s continuing commitment to environmental resources in its care and the integration of environmental stewardship into strategic planning and decision-making processes through the Lab’s Environmental Management System.