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Los Alamos National Laboratory

  • Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Visits LANL

    Admiral James A. Winnefield, the Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff visited Los Alamos National Laboratory Thursday.  Winnefield is a four star Navy Admiral, and as Vice Chairman is the second highest-ranking U.S. military officer.

    Winnefield was at Los Alamos to receive a wide variety of classified briefings that covered the broad spectrum of national security science at Los Alamos.  The Vice Chairman was briefed by the laboratory’s senior leadership including director Charlie McMillan, and Principal Associate Directors Bret Knapp and Terry Wallace.  The briefings included details of the laboratory’s Nuclear Weapons Program and Global Security portfolio.

  • NMED to lab: No renegotiation of Consent Order

    Discussion about the LANL Consent Order has been rare in a public forum.

    But this morning in Santa Fe, New Mexico Environment Department Secretary David Martin gave a presentation to the Regional Coalition of LANL Communities and he made one thing perfectly clear.

    “NMED is not renegotiating the Consent Order,” Martin said.

    So what is the Consent Order?

    An Order of Consent between the New Mexico Environment Department and Los Alamos National Laboratory was signed on March 1, 2005. The Order provides the timetable and requirements for environmental cleanup of hazardous constituents for the laboratory. Following the schedule of the Order, the clean-up program will be completed by 2015.

  • Researchers unravel mystery of quantum-dot blinking

    Research by Los Alamos scientists published in the journal Nature documents significant progress in understanding the phenomenon of quantum-dot blinking. Their findings should enhance the ability of biologists to track single particles, enable technologists to create novel light-emitting diodes and single-photon sources, and boost efforts of energy researchers to develop new types of highly efficient solar cells.

  • Nuke Safety Board to convene in Santa Fe

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board will be in Santa Fe Thursday to conduct a public meeting and discuss seismic safety of the Plutonium Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    The sessions will be from 1-5 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. at the Santa Fe Convention Center, 201 Marcy Street.

    The DNFSB is an independent agency in the executive branch of the U.S. government that oversees health and safety issues at defense nuclear facilities at LANL.

    During the first session, the board will receive testimony on National Nuclear Security Administration actions to address Plutonium Facility seismic issues that lead to severe accident scenarios.

  • LANL works on ultra-low field MRI

    LANL researchers are developing a system to make ultra-low field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) commercially viable for medical applications.
    The researchers have been working on an ultra-low field MRI system using low temperature SQUIDS (supercomputing quantum interference devices). Ultra-low field MRI with low temperature SQUIDs in a shielded room has many potential advantages for medical imaging, such as convenience, enhanced contrast, and open design.

  • Edgewater awarded subcontract by LANS

    Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS) the prime contractor operating Los Alamos National Laboratory awarded three subcontracts to perform Formality of Operations Technical Services at the laboratory last week. 

    These subcontracts will continue important ongoing work to insure operational readiness, and compliance with Department of Energy (DOE) directives and the Defense Nuclear Facilities Board (DNFSB) initiatives and recommendations.  

    The Formality of Operations Program includes processes to maintain and improve best-practices in areas such as Conduct of Operations, Conduct of Engineering, Conduct of Maintenance, Conduct of Training, and implementation of the Safety Basis and Readiness Programs across LANL.

  • LANL to unveil new research journal

    A new research journal in the burgeoning field of algae science will begin publication in 2012, steered by editors-in-chief José Olivares and Richard Sayre of Los Alamos National Laboratory.
    Algal Research is an international journal that will cover all areas of emerging technologies in algal biology, biomass production, cultivation, harvesting, extraction, bioproducts, and econometrics. The journal publishes original scientific research papers, review articles, and invited commentaries.

  • NNSA reaches pact to produce Mo-99

    The National Nuclear Security Administration’s Global Threat Reduction Initiative announced today the signing of a cooperative agreement with NorthStar Medical Radioisotopes, LLC, to further the development of accelerator-based technology to produce molybdenum-99 (Mo-99) in the United States.
    The cooperative agreement between NNSA and NorthStar, which totals $4.6 million and is funded under a 50 percent/50 percent cost-share arrangement, will accelerate the development of the NorthStar technology to produce Mo-99 without proliferation-sensitive highly enriched uranium (HEU). The agreement would also support the goal of ensuring a reliable domestic supply of this critical medical isotope for U.S. patients.

  • Lab releases 2010 environmental report

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory recently released its 2010 Environmental Report.
    The annual update is 412 pages and the Los Alamos Monitor did a quick review and here are some of the highlights.

  • Antibody project could unlock mysteries

    A National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant to Los Alamos National Laboratory Bioscience Division could help unravel the gnarly secrets of how many human genes function.
    Originally discovered in the Human Genome Project, the approximately 20,000 genes of the human body have been slow to reveal their exact roles. And one of the best tools for exposing a gene’s function is to take the protein it produces and generate specific antibodies, usually by vaccinating mice or rabbits. Antibodies are specialized proteins the immune system deploys to block the actions of potentially harmful bacteria and viruses.