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Los Alamos National Laboratory

  • President honors lab researcher

    A young Los Alamos National Laboratory scientist, Amy J. Clarke, is among the honorees that President Obama named as recipients of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE).

    “Discoveries in science and technology not only strengthen our economy, they inspire us as a people,” Obama said. “The impressive accomplishments of today’s awardees so early in their careers promise even greater advances in the years ahead.”

  • Peace exhibit opens at Bradbury

    Artist and peace activist Shannyn Sollitt doesn’t just want you to see her artwork, she wants you to feel it.
    Currently hanging in the Bradbury Science Museum’s public forum space is a symbol Sollitt created incorporating cultural and religious icons from around the world.

    “I hope that people standing in front of the icon will get peace from looking at it; will receive the positive energy that went into it and the energy from the various spiritual paths represented in it,” said Sollitt, a resident of Santa Fe. “I hope they walk out of the Bradbury Science Museum with a new sense of inspiration and hope.”

  • D.C. tackles lab oversight -- at a later time

    The Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations had scheduled a hearing for Friday in Washington. The title of the hearing is “DOE’s Nuclear Weapons Complex: Challenges to Safety, Security, and Taxpayer Stewardship.”

    But according to a Thursday afternoon posting of the Energy and Commerce Committee website, the hearing has been postponed indefinitely.

    Among those expected to testify are NNSA administrator Thom D’Agostino and Deputy Energy Secretary Daniel Poneman. Others expected to testify include Glenn Podonsky, DOE’s Chief Health, Safety and Security Officer, Gregory Friedman, DOE’s Inspector General and Gene Aloise of the Government Accountability Office.

  • NNSA seeks extension

    On June 18, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board sent a letter to the National Nuclear Security Administration and the Los Alamos National Laboratory, concerning the Plutonium Facility.

    The letter laid out DNFSB concerns with identified deficiencies in Revision 1 of the 2011 Documented Safety Analysis for the Plutonium Facility. The Board requested a report and briefing within 30 days addressing the deficiencies.

  • SOC set to make cuts

    According to an email acquired by the Los Alamos Monitor, there could be even more cutbacks at the Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    Serving Our Country (SOC), which provides security to LANL, will possibly eliminate 31 positions in a restructuring that is still under negotiations. The email indicated that SOC was pursuing voluntary separation packages for the lost positions.

    Lab spokesman Fred DeSousa said the proposed cuts are not part of the 80 contractor positions cut by LANL last month.
    He referred inquiries to SOC spokesperson Liddie Martinez, who was traveling to Washington D.C. and unavailable for comment.

  • HIV Study Could Lead to Vaccine

    Two Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists are among the team recently funded to explore ways to create the precise immune factors needed for effective vaccines against HIV.
    The Duke University-led consortium will largely concentrate on inducing broadly neutralizing antibodies that can prevent HIV-1 infection, as well as on generating protective T-cell and innate immune system responses.
    “A vaccine-elicited broadly neutralizing antibody response has the potential to block HIV infection; T-cell responses will support that response, and are likely to be able to help control and contain the virus if it breaks through the neutralizing antibody response,” said Bette Korber, one of the LANL researchers.

  • Coalition insists no lobbying efforts for CMRR project

    Rev. Holly Beaumont of Santa Fe stood up near the end of the Regional Coalition of LANL Communities meeting Friday in Española and asked a question that seemed to be making the rounds in Northern New Mexico.

    Apparently, a rumor had been circulating that the coalition has been lobbying lawmakers to restore funding for the Chemistry Metallurgy Research Replacement facility.

    The Obama administration and the National Nuclear Security Administration had made the decision to defer the CMRR project for five years. But there are other house and senate committees that are trying to bring the project back to life.

    “So what’s the coalition’s position on CMRR?” she asked.

    Moderator David Abelson was quick to respond.

  • Coalition picks director

    The Regional Coalition of LANL Communities has a new executive director.

    After a search, the coalition announced Friday that the MVM Group has been selected to provide Executive Director services to help move the Coalition forward.

    The MVM Group is a strategic consulting firm focused on the intersection of business strategy, public policy and reputation management.

    Partners DeAnza Valencia Sapien, Yasine Mogharreban Armstrong and Lillian Montoya-Rael lead the firm.
    Sapien, a New Mexico attorney, will assume lead role of Executive Director for the coalition.

  • Storm water monitoring

    Erin English (right) and two others check out posters at the LANL stormwater permit meeting Thursday night in Pojoaque. English, who works for Biohabitats in Santa Fe, was one of five speakers at the event. She talked about green infrastructure and low impact development. For more on the meeting, check out next week’s Los Alamos Monitor.

  • Molecules exhibit switch ‘handedness’ at speed of light

    A multi-institutional team of researchers including scientists with Los Alamos National Laboratory (of the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration) has created the first artificial molecules whose chirality can be rapidly switched from a right-handed to a left-handed orientation with a beam of light on them.
    Switchable molecules hold possibilities for the application of terahertz technologies across a wide range of fields, including biomedical research, homeland security and ultrahigh-speed communications.